Nova Scotia Energy Delegation Heads to Houston

first_imgA Nova Scotia delegation of 31 companies and organizations isheaded to Houston to let industry insiders know that NovaScotia’s offshore oil and gas industry is a smart investment forexploration and for industry suppliers. Energy Minister Cecil Clarke, in partnership with theOffshore/Onshore Technologies Association of Nova Scotia (OTANS),is leading the energy team to the 2005 Offshore TechnologyConference from Sunday, May 1 through Thursday, May 5. “This is one of the largest oil and gas shows in the world, soit’s important that we meet with these companies in-market andface-to-face to showcase Nova Scotia as a region with significantand untapped potential,” said Mr. Clarke. “We have made greatimprovements to our regulatory regime and that’s an importantmessage to bring to this audience.” The minister will meet with senior officials from energycompanies and will make a number of presentations on behalf ofthe province. The four-day conference includes a trade show, newsconferences, and industry meetings. There will also be technicalpresentations, including a half-day East Coast session. This year, Canada will be the featured topic at an industrybreakfast hosted by the U.S. Department of Commerce and theOffshore Technology Conference board of directors. Mr. Clarkewill provide an overview of Nova Scotia’s oil and gas potentialand discuss improvements in the regulatory environment. The 31 companies and organizations travelling to Houstonrepresent distributors, industry suppliers and businessdevelopment organizations. “This delegation shows the breadth of talent and expertise withinthe Nova Scotia petroleum supply sector,” said OTANS chair TomHickey. “We expect that this trade mission will see solidbusiness leads both for companies concentrating on the AtlanticCanada market and the international scene.” Founded in 1969, the Offshore Technology Conference is theworld’s foremost event for the development of offshore resourcesin the fields of drilling, exploration, production andenvironmental protection. With more than 2,000 exhibitingcompanies, and 50,000 delegates, the Offshore TechnologyConference ranks among the 10 most attended trade shows in theUnited States.last_img read more

Search on for entangled right whale off NB as humpback freed from

first_imgCrews were scanning waters in the Gulf of St. Lawrence on Monday in a bid to find an endangered North Atlantic right whale snarled in fishing line and buoys, just days after a humpback whale was successfully disentangled from a length of rope.Moira Brown of the Canadian Whale Institute said the right whale was first seen at about 11 a.m. Friday during a surveillance flight and did not have any gear on it. Several hours later, the same whale was spotted near Miscou Island, N.B., with a couple of small buoys and rope trailing along both sides. She said it also had fresh abrasions and appeared to have blood on its tail.The flight by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration could only stay on scene for about 10 minutes, but had to leave as it needed to refuel. Subsequent flights the following day could not find the animal.“We know we have an entangled whale out there after the end of the crab season, but we don’t know what kind of gear is on it,” she said. “This was a very fresh entanglement.”Brown, who is based in Campobello, N.B., said the whale — a male who was born in 2003 and is known as #3312 — appeared to be agitated and thrashing when it was spotted. But she said the difficulty is that entangled whales often “take off,” making it hard to locate them again.A spokeswoman with the federal Fisheries Department said the whale was last seen Friday, but that the search will continue in the southern gulf.“Regular surveillance will continue and more information will be shared if the whale is sighted again,” Lauren Sankey said in an email Monday.The incident marks the first known entanglement of the season in the gulf, where the endangered species migrates in the summer months to feed after calving off the southern U.S.The discovery of the entangled animal came a day before a humpback calf was freed from a mess of fishing line in the Bay of Fundy just off of Brier Island, N.S.The Marine Animal Response Society said on its Facebook page that the Campobello Whale Rescue Team carried out the difficult rescue on Saturday, a year after it lost one of its members during the disentanglement of a right whale.Brown said a seabird cruise boat saw the whale and reported it to the rescue group, which assembled a boat and went out to the site. A coast guard cutter was also on scene to monitor the struggling humpback who was with its mother — named Pierce — and a third humpback.She said the calf had blue rope wrapped behind the blow holes and around the head, which was being held down slightly by a weight on the line.“It had trouble lifting its head and at one point they thought one of the whales was actually underneath the calf, trying to lift it up a bit,” Brown said. “The mom was very protective of the calf and was always trying to stay between the whale rescue boat and the calf.”She said the team was able to get close enough to use a knife on the end of a pole to cut one of the head wraps, which released the weight from the calf and allowed it to swim normally. They then used a grapple to cut the remaining line off the right side.Joe Howlett died during the rescue of a North Atlantic right whale on July 10, 2017. Howlett and Mackie Greene helped found the Campobello team in 2002, and the organization has rescued about two dozen whales over the past 15 years.last_img read more

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg heads to Washington

SAN FRANCISCO — Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg will be in Washington Thursday to meet with lawmakers and talk about internet regulation.The company said the meetings are not public and it did not give details on whom Zuckerberg is meeting with and what, exactly, he’ll discuss.Facebook is under growing pressure from lawmakers and regulators concerned about how it protects users’ privacy and about its potentially anticompetitive behaviour. In July, the Federal Trade Commission fined the company a record $5 billion for privacy violations. Facebook also faces investigations into possible anticompetitive behaviour, such as its habit of buying potential rivals like Instagram.Zuckerberg’s most recent public visit to Washington was last spring when he testified before Congress about privacy, election interference and other issues.The Associated Press read more

With UN help young scientists from developing world attend nuclear seminar

About half the 76 young scientists at the World Nuclear University´s (WNU) first ever Summer Institute at the Idaho National Laboratory in Idaho Falls, United States, come from less developed countries, and are attending with financial backing from the UN International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).Averaging 30 years of age, the WNU Summer Fellows represent some 33 countries and during the programme, which ends on Saturday, attended lectures by internationally-renowned figures, known for their contributions to the development, politics and peaceful uses of nuclear science and technology.These included Hans Blix, former Head of the IAEA, and Richard Hooper and Dimitri Perricos, veteran Safeguards Inspectors who were members of the Agency´s Iraq Action team, monitoring the dismantlement of Baghdad’s weapons of mass destruction under the ousted regime of Saddam Hussein.In sessions this week, the WNU Summer Fellows presented group projects, the culmination of a month´s work, fresh ideas and innovative, if at times controversial, thinking.One team proposed the need for a World Nuclear Bank to tax countries with nuclear weapons for not disarming. “The more nuclear weapons they have, the more they pay,” United States Fellow David Barber said. The Bank would in turn channel these funds towards assisting developing countries to gain peaceful nuclear applications, or encouraging States to disarm.Other presentations focused on ways to rollout cancer therapy treatment to the developing world. Among others, action plans to provide cancer patients in Mongolia and Ghana with treatment were presented. Other teams presented energy policy plans they have developed for countries including China, Indonesia, Slovakia, Germany and the United States.The WNU was inaugurated in September 2003. The IAEA helped to shape the Summer Institute´s six-week educational programme, and participated in the selection of Fellows. The course had the support of the United States Department of Energy. read more

WTO ruling favours Mexico in US dolphinsafe tuna spat

MEXICO CITY – The World Trade Organization ruled Tuesday that Mexico’s tuna industry has been harmed by U.S. “dolphin-safe” labeling rules and says the country can seek retaliatory measures worth hundreds of millions of dollars.The decision said Mexico’s economic damages from the labeling rules amounted to $163 million a year.The Mexican government issued a statement saying it would “immediately ask the WTO’s Dispute Settlement Body for authorization to suspend benefits” and also begin an internal process of targeting imports from the United States.In past decisions, the WTO has held that the U.S. “dolphin-safe” labeling improperly interfered with trade.Mexico’s statement said its tuna industry meets “the highest international standards for the protection of dolphins and sustainability.”The U.S. Trade Representative’s Office said it was “disappointed” by the ruling.“Regrettably, the WTO Arbitrator’s decision does not take into account the United States’ most recent dolphin-safe labeling updates and dramatically overstates the actual level of trade effects on sales of Mexican tuna caught by intentionally chasing and capturing dolphins in nets,” the office said. “We will continue to monitor the situation and closely consult with Congress and stakeholders about next steps.” WTO ruling favours Mexico in US ‘dolphin-safe’ tuna spat by The Associated Press Posted Apr 25, 2017 8:34 pm MDT Last Updated Apr 25, 2017 at 10:40 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email read more

DR Congo UN report spotlights human rights violations amid wider calls for

The call comes as the UN Joint Human Rights Office in the DRC (UNJHRO) released its in-depth report documenting a number of grave human rights abuses, including summary and extrajudicial executions and enforced disappearances, carried out against civilians by Congolese security forces during ‘Operation Likofi’ (Punch) aimed at curbing urban delinquency in the country’s capital, Kinshasa.“I am appalled by the gravity of the human rights violations documented in this report,” said UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein in a press release. “And I call on the Congolese authorities to bring to justice without delay the perpetrators of these human rights violations who cannot go unpunished,” Mr. Al Hussein added. Initially charged with the objective of tracking down delinquents, or kulunas , ‘Operation Likofi’ quickly established a negative reputation as alarming reports of disappearances and assassinations of children and youth emerged within a week of the Operation’s launch in November 2013. The UNJHRO report released today further expands on these allegations, documenting 41 victims, including four children, of “violations of the right to life” and accusing State security forces of perpetrating the majority of the killings. Based on more than 70 testimonies from numerous sources, including within the police itself, the report notes that members of the DRC’s Légion nationale d’intervention (LENI) and of the Groupe mobile d’intervention (GMI) would operate at night, entering specific neighbourhoods of Kinshasa in unmarked vehicles and wearing hoods in order to commit the abuses.In a statement, Martin Kobler, the head of the UN Organisation Stabilization Mission in the DRC (MONUSCO) called on local authorities to quickly move and ensure that such crimes are no longer perpetrated and that those responsible are punished according to the rule of law. “This shows how urgent it is to accelerate security sector reform and to establish strong accountability mechanisms within the Congolese police,” he declared.Today’s UNJHRO report follows the release last week of the panel’s survey on rights violations committed by the March 23 Movement (M23) in North Kivu Province between April 2012 and November 2013. It revealed that during this period, when M23 had effective control of parts of North Kivu, serious violations of human rights and international humanitarian law – which could constitute international crimes as well as crimes under the Congolese Penal Code – were committed by the group. read more

Brockled poverty research project heads into second year

A research team spanning multiple Brock University Faculties and departments is continuing its evaluation of the services offered to those in poverty in Niagara.A partnership between the Niagara Region and Brock announced last May is examining the Niagara Prosperity Initiative (NPI) and its impact on Niagara communities.Lori Watson, Director, Social Assistance and Employment Opportunities for Niagara Region, said the research project “will help the Niagara Region develop an updated report outlining the state of poverty in Niagara — an analysis on the impacts, outcomes and offer recommendations on best practices moving forward.”A Brock-led research project looking into poverty in Niagara is headed into its second year. Pictured are some of the researchers and students involved in the project.The three-year research project was funded through a nearly half-million-dollar grant from the Government of Ontario’s Local Poverty Reduction Fund and will culminate in a final report to be released in 2021.The NPI provides $1.5 million annually to support poverty reduction and prevention activities throughout the region. In its 10 years of operation, the NPI has funded some 365 projects delivered by 85 local agencies to help more than 100,000 individuals and families experiencing poverty across Niagara.Brock’s transdisciplinary research team is led by Jeff Boggs (Geography and Tourism Studies), Michael Busseri (Psychology), Darlene Ciuffetelli Parker (Teacher Education), Joyce Engel (Nursing), Tiffany Gallagher (Teacher Education), Kevin Gosine (Sociology), Felice Martinello (Economics), Dawn Prentice (Nursing) and Dennis Soron (Sociology).In 2018, the NPI evaluation team:Formulated a communications strategyFormed a community advisory teamReviewed previous research, statistics and the landscape of poverty and poverty reduction efforts in Niagara and comparable regionsInterviewed people who were instrumental to the development and management of NPI, with a focus on NPI’s history and objectivesSpoke with NPI-funded project leads with a focus on the impact of NPI fundingCreated a comparison of actual and expected outputsAnalyzed testimonials from NPI service usersIn 2019, the NPI evaluation team is aiming to:Form a lived experience advisory groupContinue speaking with NPI-funded project leadsMeasure the impact of NPI assistance on service user well-beingSurvey a representative sample of Niagara residents affected by povertyEvaluate NPI-funded literacy projectsDevelop inclusive photo-reporting practicesAssess service user feedback mechanismsReview the NPI request for proposal and review processThe NPI evaluation team received contributions and support from a number of places, including Brock’s Social Justice Research Institute, which initiated the partnership and facilitated the grant application process, the Faculty of Social Sciences and the wider Brock community.Members of the Community Advisory Team, including Catherine Livingston, Diane Corkum, Jackie Van Lankveld and Jane LaVacca, reviewed and provided feedback on the project plan. Fourth-year Sociology students conducted 25 interviews with NPI-funded project leads. The Information and Analytics Team, a business unit with Niagara Region’s Information Technology Solutions division, identified and facilitated access to poverty-related data collected by the Niagara Region and its partners.For more information, visit the NPI Evaluation project website at brocku.ca/npi-evaluation read more

SmartKeyboard An iPhone keyboard inspired by the iPad Smart Cover

first_imgThere’s always something that when we see it we think why hasn’t anyone thought of that already? The latest device in that category solves the problem of the iPhone not having a physical keyboard. True, most iPhone users get used to typing on the iPhone’s touchscreen, but it could be the lack of keyboard that turns some people off from the phone altogether. There are plenty of consumers who want a phone with a keyboard and a touchscreen, and there are certainly phones out there that offer those features. But, if you want to be part of the iPhone club, you had to go keyboard-free – until now.Jing Yang of the eico Motion Lab in China created a concept for an iPhone keyboard that uses the same magnetic solution seen in the iPad 2 Smart Covers. The SmartKeyboard, as it’s named, would be able to slide off the phone easily when you’re done using it. True, you probably wouldn’t want to snap the keyboard on and off your phone every time you use it, but judging by the video below, it looks like you could just fold it up. This also doubles as a stand for your phone or a shooting handle for when you’re taking photos. It also lays flat on the phone’s back, so that when you need it, you just flip it to the front.The SmartKeyboard also gives you more screen space since it takes up the entire bottom part of your phone. It may be about a half an inch more of space, but it’s still a nice plus. The QWERTY keyboard also has LED backlit capabilities, so you don’t have to worry about not being able to see it while using it in the dark. Plus, it will come in a variety of colors, so you’ll have plenty of options.No word on when this concept will become a reality. There’s not a real website for the product yet, but from what we could tell from the YouTube video’s comments, the design will be changing. As you can see, the keyboard goes over the Home button, so there needs to be a way to access that still. Also, there are no numbers, which will also change, gearing more towards a BlackBerry-style keyboard.via Dvicelast_img read more

The 9 at 9 Thursday

first_img Short URL Image: Shutterstock/Oleksandra Naumenko Thursday 9 Mar 2017, 8:53 AM The 9 at 9: Thursday Here are the top stories as Thursday gets underway. http://jrnl.ie/3278221 Share Tweet Email By Cormac Fitzgerald Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article Mar 9th 2017, 8:53 AM 10,334 Views EVERY MORNING, TheJournal.ie brings you the stories you need to know as you start your day.1. #HIT AND RUN: A man is in a serious condition after a hit and run incident in Artane in Dublin.2. #CONTAMINATION: A new EPA report has shown that private water supplies are generally more contaminated than public supplies.3. #ABUSE: Child and family agency Tusla has received 56,000 reports of child abuse in a three-year span.4. TRAGEDY: An investigation into the fire that killed four people yesterday (including three children) in Clondalkin is set to resume this morning, RTÉ reports.5. #DROGHEDA: A man in his 70s died after being involved in a single vehicle crash yesterday in Louth.6. #GRACE: The new terms of reference into an investigation around allegations of severe sexual abuse of a child while she was in foster care over a prolonged period of time are set to be debated in the Dáil today.7. #GRAND STRETCH: The weather has improved in recent days, with dry conditions and temperatures set to reach 14 degrees in places.8. #WIKILEAKS: The CIA has launched a criminal investigation after a trove of hacking tools used by the agency were released by Wikileaks.9. #DELAYS: There are significant delays of up to 40 minutes on all services through Connolly Station in Dublin due to an earlier point problem. Image: Shutterstock/Oleksandra Naumenko No Comments last_img read more

Northern Trust introduces childcare advice benefit for London staff

first_imgGlobal financial services organisation Northern Trust has launched a new childcare support and advice benefit for its 1,600 London-based staff.The benefit, provided by Parental Choice, will offer assistance to employees with childcare responsibilities based at the organisation’s London office. This includes tailored childcare searches for all ages across all forms of childcare, such as nurseries, schools, childminders, and nannies, as well as payroll, pension, and employment law advice for staff that employ nannies. Parents and employees with childcare responsibilities will also be able to attend informative talks.The new benefit, which launched today (5 April 2017), will run alongside Northern Trust’s current family-friendly benefits offering. This includes maternity, paternity, adoption and shared parental leave, flexible working policies, maternity and paternity coaching sessions, free back-up childcare sessions, and seminars on a variety of parenting topics. The organisation also supports the Happy to Talk Flexible campaign, run by work-life balance charity Working Families.Sarah Boddey (pictured), chief diversity and inclusion officer at Northern Trust Europe, Middle East, Africa and Asia Pacific, said: “We know that parents and those with childcare responsibilities face a particular challenge in trying to maintain a strong work-life balance and searching for a good nursery, school or other childcare options can feel an overwhelming task on an already long and never-ending to-do list.”Mark Lacey, head of human resources at Northern Trust Europe, Middle East and Africa, added: “We are constantly striving to attract, retain and advance a diverse workforce at Northern Trust so that we can better meet the needs of the clients and communities we serve. We want to ensure we are doing all we can at Northern Trust so that those caring for children have the support and tools they need to navigate their careers and childcare responsibilities successfully.”last_img read more

ABM Annual Meeting Coverage

first_imgSan Francisco—American Business Media’s Annual Conference opened Monday and sessions hewed closely to the event’s central theme of growing business off of consumer insights and data.Morning sessions looked at ways to monetize the audience. Justin Greeves, vice president of research and Margaret Mohr, chief marketing officer, at e.Republic, a media company that targets the state and local government markets, talked about creating “intelligent products,” meaning the company builds its products off of what it understands about its audience. “We have a lot of information coming into e.Republic, but not enough intelligence,” said Greeves. “Information is a commodity, people get it from many sources, but what we do is take the information and put together intelligence for our sponsors and people looking to sell into state and local government.” In that same session, John Siefert, CEO of Virgo, described how his company has determined the value of each audience member in each step through their content consumption process. “We created what we refer to as a ‘ladder of engagement,’” he said. “We created literal dollar signs next to each rung of the ladder and by creating this approach we were able to see how much an audience member was worth to us at each rung of the ladder.” By looking at the content customers were accessing, Siefert could score each of them according to where they were in the lead pipeline. From there, Virgo began mapping its content according to the expectations of the audience and where each person was in what Siefert called the “information journey.” This organizational and value scoring process led to the creation of content libraries and web stores where customers can purchase products—from event session videos to PDFs to digital magazines and webinars—on demand. The event videos, for example, are $50 each and run for 45 minutes. The store has been up for about 3 months and Siefert says he has about 500 customers from 22 countries.Ecommerce Supplants Advertising Ecommerce has become a huge push for F+W Media on the digital front, and the company’s chief digital officer Chad Phelps described the company’s move into ecommerce and other non-advertising related revenue streams in the “Putting Metrics Into Action” session. Facing declining CPMs and limited inventory, and being a largely ad-driven company online in 2008 with about 90 percent of digital revenue coming from advertising, Phelps determined future growth was limited. F+W’s first ecommerce store was opened in 2009 that sold content products ranging from DVDs to books and PDFs. In 2010 the company launched 16 more stores. “One of my goals is to create as many content products as I can,” said Phelps. “And it’s not just words on a page, it’s online education, it’s paid seminars, it’s data products, any form of content that has value to our audience and to us.”By 2011, online advertising accounted for only 16 percent of F+W’s overall digital revenue, which Phelps described as “into eight figures.” Phelps buys so heavily into the customer-centric view, that advertising has become an afterthought in the overall digital strategy. “Advertising is gravy for me now. We put all of our thought and energy into the consumer.” Revenue, Profits and Valuations for B-to-BAn afternoon session highlighted ABM’s new study “Managing Profits in a Changing Media Industry,” which broke down revenue, costs and profits among a a select group of ABM membership survey respondents. About 30 companies responded, with 26 providing fully completed data, which, said Michael Alterio, ABM’s research and content director, was up from previous surveys. According to the study, digital and events grew by 15.5 percent and 9.8 percent respectively, but print was down -2.3 percent. The revenue share among the three for the year was print at 44 percent, events at 28 percent and digital at about 21 percent. John Wickersham, a partner at Atwood Capital Partners, meshed the ABM financial data with his firm’s own projections and extended the data through 2016. Print, said Wickersham, will continue to decline at a rate of about 2 percentage points through the next 4 years. Events will start strong but moderate to about 3 percent growth during that same period. Overall, however, Wickersham said most companies will likely see their revenue pies split into thirds between the print, digital and event buckets by 2016.EBITDA multiples at the current revenue mix are sitting at about 4x-6x and, said Wickersham, “There are a significant number of b-to-b media companies that have yet to achieve the current average revenue mix.” Broken out, print multiples go for 4x or under, said Wickersham. Events are now at about 7x-8x and digital, depending on its core business—lead gen versus display, for example—is at least as high as events or sometimes well above.Wickersham was bullish on multiples 4 years from now. By 2016 an advanced media platform could achieve a multiple range of 8x-12x. The buyer pool will be much different as well, with private equity, said Wickersham bowing out due to waning interest. Big strategics, except for UBM, are largely out of the picture. International is where the action will be. “From our vantage point, we see a lot of international buyers,” said Wickersham. “We’re predicting that well before five years there will be a lot of international buyers jumping into this market and many from Asia.”last_img read more

USPS Increases FYQ3 Revenue by 2 Percent With 2 Billion in Losses

first_imgTo compound the financial situation further, Corbett also says that the organization is unable to make the required $5.7 billion retiree health benefit prefunding payment to the U.S. Treasury by the Sept. 30 deadline. Eliminating this liability will require Congressional legislation, but the USPS feels it is necessary in order to secure long-term financial stability. The United States Postal Service reported more bad news today when it revealed its fiscal third quarter net loses equaled $2 billion, dramatically higher than the $740 million it lost in the same period in 2013. That now makes 21 out of the last 23 quarters in which the USPS has recorded a loss. Although, the two quarters without losses were due to Congressional reschedulings of prefunded retiree health benefits. The report wasn’t necessarily all bad news, as revenue is continuing to improve. In FYQ3 the USPS increased its Y-O-Y revenue by 2 percent. The organization attributes the extra $327 million in new revenue to price increases and renewed sales and marketing initiatives. But, $18.4 billion in operating expenses (up by $1.5 billion from last year) leaves an uncomfortable shortfall.In an official statement, Patrick Donahoe, Postmaster General and CEO, says that the organization is seeing momentum in its package and direct mail products, and indicates that it is continuing to improve how it leverages data and technology. Nevertheless, Joseph Corbett, CFO and EVP at USPS says major investments will be necessary to adequately reverse the negative financial trends. “Due to continued losses and low levels of liquidity, we’ve been extremely conservative with our capital, spending only what is deemed essential to maintain existing infrastructure,” Corbett says in a statement. “To continue to provide world-class service and remain competitive we must invest up to $10 billion to replace our aging fleet, purchase additional package sorting equipment, and make necessary upgrades to our infrastructure.”last_img read more

Amazon Prime Day 2019 OnePlus 7 comes in Mirror Blue hue

first_img Tags OnePlus 7 has a ‘faster’ screen. Will you care? CNET may get a commission from retail offers. Mentioned Above OnePlus 7 Pro (256GB, Mirror Gray) Now playing: Watch this: OnePlus 7 up close 1:38 $787 See it null Phones Amazon Prime Amazon OnePlus OnePlus 7 Pro News • OnePlus 7 Pro camera upgrades reportedly coming Imagine this, in blue. Andrew Hoyle/CNET The OnePlus 7 is taking a Mirror Blue turn, at least in India. A banner on Amazon’s Indian site revealed the new color variant for the OnePlus 7 Pro’s budget sibling for India’s Prime Day on July 15.The phone is only available in Mirror Gray in the UK, and isn’t available at all in either the US or Australia currently. The OnePlus 7’s Mirror Blue is pretty much the same as the Pro’s Nebula Blue, 9to5Google notes. How To • OnePlus 7 Pro: 10 essential tips you need to know 0 Share your voice 10 Photos OnePlus confirmed via email that the Mirror Blue variant is only available in India, where it costs 32,999 rupees (roughly $480, £385 or AU$695). First published at 6:00 a.m. PT.Updated at 7:38 a.m. PT: Adds OnePlus confirmation that Mirror Blue is India-exclusive. Review • OnePlus 7 Pro is the best Android phone value of 2019last_img read more

Trump Pledged To Take On The NRA Now Hes Speaking At Groups

first_imgScott Olson/Getty ImagesThen-presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at the National Rifle Association’s NRA-ILA Leadership Forum during the NRA Convention on May 20, 2016, in Louisville, Ky.President Trump will speak at the National Rifle Association’s annual convention on Friday, a little more than two months after he pledged to stand up to the gun rights organization in the aftermath of the Parkland, Fla., school shooting.In the days after the shooting that killed 17 people, Trump called out lawmakers for being “afraid” of the NRA, saying the group had “less power” over him. He even publicly backed raising the minimum age to buy long guns and supported imposing more expansive background checks — positions strongly opposed by the NRA.But when the White House actually announced its proposals to improve school safety, the approach was much more narrow and pretty much in line with NRA policy stances.The mismatch between Trump’s rhetoric on gun laws and the legislative actions he ultimately ended up backing fits a larger pattern for Trump. He has repeatedly floated ideas publicly, seemingly off the cuff, before pulling back to conform with more mainstream Republican principles.“It often seems that Trump pivots to more traditional positions once longtime actors in the policy process are able to brief him about why Republicans hold positions at odds with the ones he just espoused,” said Justin Vaughn, director of the Center for Idaho History and Politics at Boise State University.Vaughn said the result is that Trump ends up falling in line with his base, but he may get fewer policy “wins.”The president was able to sign into law some measures that address deficiencies in the current national background check system, although those provisions fell short of calls for requiring background checks all gun purchases.Trump had similar moments on immigration. In January, during a televised bipartisan meeting with lawmakers, he expressed openness to backing a bill that would protect young immigrants from deportation without including funding for a wall on the southern border.The White House wound up putting out a proposal that included a path to citizenship for those young immigrants in the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program and $25 billion for a border wall.Congress has yet to pass legislation addressing DACA.By showing a willingness to take positions that buck his party’s line without following through, Trump is able to play up his independence without dealing with the consequences of actually enacting policy.“When he does tough talk like, ‘I’m not afraid of the NRA’ … it says more about his persona, his image and his core supporters love that,” said Robert Denton, head of the department of communication at Virginia Tech.But there are some risks to vacillating between various viewpoints.“These inconsistent policy positions leave allies and foes alike unsure where he stands and uncertain about him keeping his word after they leave the negotiating table,” said Brandon Rottinghaus, a political science professor at the University of Houston.The White House defended the president’s decision to speak at the NRA, despite the intense criticism the group has faced since the Parkland shooting.White House press secretary Sarah Sanders said at a briefing on Tuesday that safety is a priority for the Trump administration.“But we also support the Second Amendment, and strongly support it, and don’t see there to be a problem with speaking at the National Rifle Association’s meeting,” Sanders said.Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Sharelast_img read more

Another security breach Grindr reveals users exact location

first_imgeTN Chatroom for Readers (join us) Discovered by blog Queer Europe, they used a third-party app called ‘F*ckr’. It hacks into the company’s private API and uses a technique called trilateration, giving the precise location of its users.It also exposes the sensitive information found on the app, including sexual position, HIV status, and ‘tribe’.By giving such intimate details, this could leave users vulnerable to harassment and stalking. This video, uploaded to Twitter, shows the scary reality:Applications designed to locate Grindr users are publicly available online, and give anyone access to a virtual map on which you can travel from city to city, and from country to country, while seeing the exact location of cruising men that share their distance online. pic.twitter.com/0IumD6laAE— Queer Europe (@QueerEurope) September 13, 2018F*ckr has now been disabled by its host, GitHub. However, Queer Europe claims that these apps are widely available online.The blog adds: ‘After security vulnerabilities had been revealed in 2014, Grindr disabled the distance function in some homophobic countries, such as Russia, Nigeria, Egypt, Iraq and Saudi Arabia.‘However, it is still possible to locate users in many other countries, such as Algeria, Turkey, Belarus, Ethiopia, Qatar, Abu Dhabi, Oman, Azerbaijan, China, Malaysia and Indonesia.’ GAYSTARNEWS- Grindr’s security issues are once again in the spotlight as a third party app pinpointed users’ exact location.Despite constant reassurances from the app about the difficulties of exploiting their location technology, the latest security breach revealed how malicious parties can locate users. Major data flaw in two gay dating apps could allow hackers to steal your dataNew gay dating app has ‘bank-level’ security for those afraid to be outedGrindr faces investigation for sharing HIV data with third partiesRead the full article on Gaystarnews:  :https://www.gaystarnews.com/article/another-security-breach-at-grindr-reveals-users-exact-location/ Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… Countries at riskWith these security flaws, it could allow hostile governments to target gay, bisexual and transgender individuals using the app.This isn’t the first time the hook-up software has faced such a data breach. Earlier this year, a similar app called ‘C*ckblocked’ was able to pinpoint the exact location of users too.After that breach, the company released a statement, claiming ‘safety and security of our users is of paramount importance to us’.As a company that serves the LGBTQ community, we understand the delicate nature of our users’ privacy. Ensuring safety and security of our users is of paramount importance to us and will continue to be our top priority. pic.twitter.com/vD2zXqxSr0— Grindr (@Grindr) March 29, 2018However, there are still problems. For example, earlier this year it was uncovered that Grindr was revealing its users’ HIV status to third-party companies. It later faced investigation.More from Gay Star News: Alt-right journalist hilariously alerts FBI when he gets banned from GrindrGay man attempts to sue Grindr for allowing ‘No Asians’ commentsFrom Grindr to Kindr? The release of a nicer alternative: KindrGot a news tip? Want to share your story? Email us .last_img read more

You wouldnt have a pub in a service station employee hits out

first_imgDad slams ‘disgusting’ hospital window Punter found hiding in bushes Traffic on the A500 at junction 16 of the M6 “That leads to us getting harassed on the night shifts because we didn’t sell them alcohol, I have friends and family who have had this experience a lot. Even myself at a previous job. Vigilance can only go so far before the constant harassing takes its toll. “We get roughly nine drunks for every one sober person asking for booze. Even tonight as I’m writing this email there have been two incidents involving drunken people in which the police have been involved in. “Given that we are off a junction for the M6 I don’t think it’s a good idea to be selling booze just because of the close proximity to the motorway. You wouldn’t have a pub in a service station.” “You never gave this site a license before it was Shell, and if I’m honest I don’t particularly see why it should be given one now. I strongly believe that it will cause more grief to not just the workers in the petrol station but to KFC, Travelodge and Greggs. Read MoreShopper buys traffic warden a doughnut as a thank you – and returns to car to find a parking ticket   “Travelodge especially as they will have a lot of customers getting drunk in there rooms at the night time and possibly having to call the police. The only benefit I can see of having a license is that profits will go up ever so slightly. But the negatives outweigh the positives tenfold.” The employee added there were also issues with amount of space in the petrol station’s storeroom. In their application form, Shell said the petrol station’s convenience store served both the local community and passing motorists. The application added:  “This is a well-established convenience store which is due to undergo a refurbishment later this year. The site trades under Shell UK Oil Products Limited and is operated by Khanna Petroleum Limited. An ATM will be located on site. “The convenience store will have retail area of approximately 630 sq ft. Read MoreMan cut free from van following accident on M6   “The purpose built store has been designed to serve both the local community along with passing trade. The convenience store operates 24 hours per day, seven days per week. The store will stock a range of fresh foods and dairy produce, groceries and other domestic products and will also offer ‘express’ lunch facilities. “In addition dry fuel products such as BBQ charcoal/kindling/logs will be available. Off sales are a standard and expected feature of the convenience store service. The internal and external digital CCTV system will benefit from a recorder with 31 day image retention and recordings can be made available to Police and other enforcement agencies as needed. “The convenience store will be operated by the Manager assisted by a team of full and part time staff. The Designated Premises Supervisor, is trained and certified through an accredited scheme and is responsible for training all staff-utilising the Lockett & Co Due Diligence package-and keeping complete training records. The Challenge 25 trading initiative will be used supported by the refusals system with records kept in the Refusals Log.” Cheshire East Council’s Licensing Sub-committee are set to make a decision on the application at 2pm on Friday (June 21). Read MoreTop stories on StokeonTrentLive Follow StokeonTrentLive Download our app  – You can download our free app for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store , or get the Android version from Google Play .  Follow StokeonTrentLive on Facebook – Like our Facebook page to get the latest news in your feed and join in the lively discussions in the comments. Click here to give it a like! Follow us on Twitter – For breaking news and the latest stories, click here to follow SOTLive on Twitter . Follow us on Instagram – Featuring pictures past and present from across Stoke-on-Trent, North Staffordshire & South Cheshire – and if you tag us in your posts, we could repost your picture on our page! We also put the latest news in our Instagram Stories. Click here to follow StokeonTrentLive on Instagram . Driver named following fatal collision Police search for missing woman Get the biggest Daily stories by emailSubscribeSee our privacy noticeThank you for subscribingSee our privacy noticeCould not subscribe, try again laterInvalid EmailA worker at a petrol station off two major roads has hit out at plans for the site to be given a 24-hour licence to sell alcohol – as it prepares to give its convenience store a refurbishment. Shell Barthomley, at Crewe Services near junction 16 of the M6 – where the motorway meets the A500 between Stoke-on-Trent and Crewe – has applied for a licence that would allow it to sell booze, to be consumed off the premises, around the clock. The garage, which shares the site with a Greggs, a Travelodge and a KFC Drive Thru, has also applied to provide late night refreshment, including hot drinks and warm snack foods, between 11pm and 5am when the refurbishment takes place later this year. One employee at the petrol station has lodged an objection to the application with Cheshire East Council saying they have a number of concerns about the scheme and that they ‘don’t think it’s a good idea’ and that ‘no one at this site’ wants it. In their statement opposing the scheme, the anonymous worker said:  “I work the night shifts and how many people we get at night who are drunk and ask if we sell booze is uncountable. “If we say we don’t sell booze then that’s the end of the matter they go on their way, but if we did sell booze we wouldn’t be able to sell it to them because they’re drunk. Read MoreFlood alert renewed as river levels remain high and roads shutlast_img read more

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first_img News | July 14, 2008 New Irrigation Fluid Warming System Offers Dry Heat Solution to Surgical Irrigation July 15, 2008 – The Ranger Irrigation Fluid Warming System from Arizant Healthcare is said to offer the high-volume d read more July 7, 2008 – BSD Medical Corp. said today seven new BSD-500 hyperthermia systems have been purchased by major cancer treatment center in the U.S. The most recent purchase was by the Massey Cancer Center at Virginia Commonwealth University located in Richmond, VA. Other notable cancer care hospitals that have also purchased or installed BSD hyperthermia systems this year include:- Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute in Cleveland, OH- William Beaumont Hospital in Grosse Pointe, MI- Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center at Northwestern University in Chicago- Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center in Phoenix, AZ- Cancer Treatment Centers of America (CTCA) in Tulsa, OK- Spectrum Health Blodgett Hospital in Grand Rapids, MIThe BSD-500 systems purchased by these cancer institutions are employed to treat various types of cancer. Hyperthermia is used to make cancer cells more sensitive to radiation as well as destroy cancer cells directly. In Phase III clinical trials where hyperthermia was combined with radiation, hyperthermia improved two-year local control of melanoma from 28 percent to 46 percent, complete response for recurrent breast cancer from 23 percent to 68 percent and the five-year survival rate from zero percent to 53 percent in patients with head and neck cancer, compared to the use of radiation therapy alone.For more information: www.BSDMedical.com FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 News | July 06, 2008 Seven U.S. Cancer Institutions Add Hyperthermia System News | March 27, 2008 Futuremed Unveils New Fluid, Blood Warmers March 28, 2008 – Futuremed will release its newest models of fluid and blood warmers, the Astotherm-Plus and Astoflo- read more Related Content News | August 14, 2008 BSD Submits PMA Data for Microwave Ablation System August 15, 2008 – BSD Medical Corp. read more News | October 23, 2008 European Journal of Cancer Emphasizes Hyperthermia’s Role in Cancer Treatments October 24, 2008 – BSD Medical Corp. read more News | August 19, 2008 MR-Tomography Monitor Thermal Therapy Cancer Treatments August 20, 2008 – The BSD-2000/3D/MR, an imaging system that uses MR-tomography, produces high quality thermal imagin read more Technology | February 20, 2008 GE Healthcare Launches Infant Warmer for Newborns GE Healthcare announced the launch of its new Panda Warmer for infant care, featuring clinical improvements for labor read more News | May 18, 2008 Underbody Blanket Allows Access to Lower Body Procedures May 19, 2008 – Arizant Healthcare Inc. read more News | May 04, 2009 ECRI Lists Top 10 Hospital Technologies to Watch in 2009 May 4, 2009 – ECRI Institute released its top 10 list of health technologies that hospital corporate-suite executives… read more News | July 14, 2008 Gaymar�s Redesigned T/Pump Provides Cold, Warm Temperature Therapy July 15, 2008 – Gaymar Industries� redesigned T/Pump series of products used for localized temperature therapy offe read more News | March 25, 2008 LMA Expands Product Offering with Purchase of Pain Management Business March 26, 2008 – LMA International recently announced it acquired the pain management business of Breg Inc., a Califo read more last_img read more

itnTV Conversations Creating an Interoperability Strategy

first_img Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Find more SCCT news and videos Find more SCCT news and videos Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Information Technology View all 220 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Recent Videos View all 606 items Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Conference Coverage View all 396 items Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Find more SCCT news and videoscenter_img Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Sponsored Content | Videos | Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Find more SCCT news and videos Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Find more news and videos from AAPM. With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Women’s Health View all 62 items Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Technology Reports View all 9 items Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability StrategyVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 6:28Loaded: 2.58%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -6:28 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June.last_img read more

La Platina Bridge to close Wednesday night Saturday for repairs

first_imgRelated posts:Public Transportation Minister: ‘Platina Bridge a failure’ ‘La Platina’ bridge head loses job Polls reveal Ticos thoughts on Chinchilla, crime and the environment Government has no funds to build road to San Ramón The National Roadway Council (CONAVI) announced the closing Wednesday night of the “Platina” Bridge on the General Cañas Highway. Workers will repair a hole in the bridge that appeared last Friday.The bridge, which connects San José with the province of Alajuela, will be closed from 10 p.m. on Wednesday to 5 a.m. on Thursday.Work will continue over the weekend, and the bridge also will be closed on Saturday. It will reopen on Sunday.CONAVI’s roadway maintenance manager, Cristian Vargas, said that studies done on the bridge concluded that workers will have to completely change a concrete panel in two lanes of the road. Repairs will take longer than expected, he said, and workers will use “higher quality materials” than previously used on the notoriously problematic bridge.A major overhaul of the bridge over the Virilla River is planned for next year, when CONAVI will completely replace metal grids with a new concrete slab, at cost of $6 million.Last year, María Ramírez, in charge of bridges at the Public Works and Transport Ministry, lost her job after failing to properly repair the bridge, despite spending $3.8 million. Facebook Commentslast_img read more

US consulate in Berlin evacuated as precaution

first_imgPolice experts checked the building to see if any chemical substances or poisonous gases had been released but nothing was found, police spokesman Michael Merkle told n-tv television.Bennett said she had no immediate information on the status of the person who brought the envelope in, and Merkle would not comment, citing the ongoing investigation.The U.S. Embassy is located in downtown but the consulate is in the southwestern Zehlendorf suburb.(Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.) Construction begins on Chandler hospital expansion project Early signs of cataracts in your parents and how to help Bottoms up! Enjoy a cold one for International Beer Day Men’s health affects baby’s health too Mary Coyle ice cream to reopen in central Phoenix Comments   Share   center_img Sponsored Stories Top Stories BERLIN (AP) – The U.S. consulate in Berlin was evacuated as a precaution Thursday after an employee reported a strange smell from an envelope, but police said no dangerous materials were found in a sweep of the building.The smell came from an envelope containing supporting materials for a visa application that was given to consular employees by the applicant in person, U.S. Embassy spokeswoman Ruth Bennett said. How Arizona is preparing the leader of the next generation Former Arizona Rep. Don Shooter shows health improvementlast_img read more