Butch James to leave Bath

first_imgBath Rugby can confirm that it has been agreed in principle that Butch James will be leaving the club at the end of the season to join Super 15 side Golden Lions.The South African fly-half joined Bath in November 2007, after lifting the World Cup with the Springboks. In 58 appearances for Bath he has scored 327 points, with his inspirational attacking play and unforgiving defensive work making him a key member of the squad.Head Coach Steve Meehan said “Butch is a very talented rugby player, and so we will obviously be disappointed to see him leave at the end of the season. He has been a great squad member, both on and off the pitch, and an inspirational player in many ways. I have absolutely no doubt, however, that he will still play a very important part for us in the remainder of this season, and will be aiming to leave the Club with a fantastic season completed.” Butch said “My time at Bath has been the most enjoyable of my rugby career. I have made great friends, enjoyed the rugby we have played and have been amazed by the Bath supporters – by far the best set of supporters I have played for! I want to give myself the best possible shot at playing for South Africa in the World Cup, and I feel that is best achieved by returning home and being in the country. I would like to thank everyone at the Club for their support, and also the great fans of Bath Rugby who have been so fantastic in my time here.”ends LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

France prepare for the final in Auckland

first_imgThierry Dusautoir will lead France in the final The French Rugby squad took the heat off their Rugby World Cup 2011 finals build-up with a relaxed day out in Auckland.The players and management enjoyed a typical Kiwi barbeque lunch at the waterside Riverhead Tavern and a thrilling jet-boat ride on Auckland’s Waitemata Harbour.While experiencing a high-speed blast and sweeping turns the group made the most of their day off from training ahead of their penultimate match against the All Blacks this Saturday 23 October.Fast-footed half-back Dimitri Yachvili says it was a great way to spend their day.“Obviously we’ve got a big challenge ahead of us this weekend but the feeling amongst the team is good. It’s nice to spend an afternoon together to re-focus,” he says.The French team has been based in Auckland for the majority of their Tournament. Coach Marc Lievremont says they’ve enjoyed their time in New Zealand’s largest city.“It’s important for us to do activities as a team off the field, and today has been fantastic. Auckland has been an excellent base for the squad,” he says.Nestled on the shores of Auckland’s Waitemata Harbour the Riverhead Tavern is New Zealand’s oldest riverside tavern and a popular destination for dining.Auckland Jet Boat Tours is based in the Viaduct Harbour and runs daily adventure trips that combine high-speed thrills with exhilarating speeds of 85 kilometres per hour. Getting out on the water is one of Auckland’s must-do tourism activities. Auckland is affectionately known as the City of Sails and has the highest boat ownership per capita in the world.For more information about Auckland visit www.aucklandnz.comcenter_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Dropping Picamoles a big risk for Saint-André

first_imgUnder fire: Pascal PapéThe fans – the real French rugby fans as opposed to the Johnny-come-latelys who believe that Sébastien Chabal is the greatest player ever to wear the jersey – are furious with Picamoles’s demotion. “Incohérence”, “incompréhensible” and “incompetence” litter the posts left on the Midi Olympique messageboard. As several fans point out, how on earth has Pascal Papé retained the captaincy in the light of Friday’s farce? It’s questionable whether Papé is an international-class lock but he is most certainly not an international-class captain. Petulant with opponents and team-mates, at one point on Friday he yelled at Hugo Bonneval after the wing failed to read his wild pass. So much for a cool head in a crisis.And how will Picamoles’s humiliation sit within the France squad? Only last week one of the France forwards told this correspondent that the Toulouse No 8 was one of the real characters in Les Bleus, a player with a ready laugh who changed into a ferocious competitor the moment he took the field. In short Picamoles is popular with his mates, and no one likes to see a mate hung out to dry.Nine’s time: will Machenaud get a start?At least PSA has resisted the urge to recall Francois Trinh-Duc. The Montpellier fly-half is not the answer to France’s problems. Why should he be now after failing to impose himself in his previous six seasons of international rugby?If France are to have any chance of coming good in time for next year’s World Cup then PSA must keep faith with Jules Plisson at fly-half. The young ten had a tough time of it in Cardiff but which fly-half wouldn’t behind a pack going backwards and a scrum-half coming apart at the seams? LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Fall guy: Louis Picamoles is wrapped up by the Welsh defence during Friday night’s defeatBy Gavin MortimerIT TOOK only 80 minutes but Philippe Saint-André once more finds himself with the world on his shoulders. Two victories from their first two matches in this Six Nations went some way towards banishing memories of France’s disastrous 2013 but their capitulation against Wales on Friday has exposed the failings of this French side.The man fingered by PSA as the fall guy for France’s record 27-6 defeat in Cardiff is No 8 Louis Picamoles. That’s the Louis Picamoles who in the previous game against Italy had been France’s standout performer. It wasn’t the yellow card that the big man was shown in the second-half that enraged PSA, rather Picamoles’s reaction as he trudged towards the touchline. A sarcastic round of applause aimed at referee Alain Rolland has cost Picamoles his place in the side.“Respect is the foundation of our values,” declared PSA on Monday evening, shortly after announcing his 30-man squad for the match in Edinburgh on Saturday week. “It is important to send a signal to all of the players and remind them that having the privilege of wearing the France jersey demands certain duties and obligations.”It’s all a bit heavy-handed, haughty even, particularly given that for the past few months the clubs and the federation have been fighting like rats in a sack for control of the game in France. Picamoles, justifiably, felt aggrieved for being sent to the sin-bin for failing to roll away from the tackle when he was trapped at the bottom of a ruck. He shouldn’t have made the gesture, but who among us hasn’t let our emotions get the better of us in the heat of the moment? A dressing down from PSA the next day should have sufficed.No doubt PSA’s decision will go down well with the FFR and their assorted sponsors and broadcasting partners. Much is made in France of rugby’s values, in contrast to the brattish behaviour of their football stars, and Picamoles has paid the price for the FFR’s desire portray a squeaky clean image. NOT FOR FEATURED It was always a gamble going for Jean-Marc Doussain and alas it hasn’t worked out for the Toulouse scrum-half. Morgan Parra has been called up for the Scotland game but the Clermont nine was sent-off on Saturday after headbutting Montpellier’s Rene Ranger (what was that PSA was saying about values!). He now faces a disciplinary hearing and it may be that Parra’s return to the national squad is short-lived. That is not necessarily a bad thing; good player that he is, Parra is a scrum-half who likes to run the show and his presence in the starting XV would undermine Plisson. Pair the Stade Francais fly-half with Maxime Machenaud and France will have their best half-back partnership.But with centre Wesley Fofana out for the rest of the Six Nations with a broken rib, and flanker Yannick Nyanga also sidelined with injury, France must travel to Scotland without two of their most enterprising players. It’s a match Saint-André has to win; defeat and the humiliation for the France coach will be far worse than that he has inflicted on Picamoles.last_img read more

Japan 2019: See the splendour of Kanagawa between Rugby World Cup matches

first_img Great Buddha: Kamakura is home to one of Japan’s national treasures LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Spiritual destination: In KamakuraWhat about Kamakura, though? Well things here take a more spiritual path. Undoubtedly the highlight is the Great Buddha. This 44ft, 121-ton bronze statue is one of Japan’s national treasures and a breathtaking, must-see sight. As is the Hasedera Temple – another Buddhist wonder. There are a great many Shinto sights to see here, too – the Tsurugaoka Hachimangu is a truly impressive vision as you approach its steps. And the ‘bamboo temple’ of Hokoku-ji offers something a little more sedate.Related: Shane Williams and Andy Powell try sumo wrestlingIn fact, if you want to enjoy a winding and informative tour past the many temples and shrines, a rickshaw tour around Kamakura’s back streets can be very informative.Believe it or not, the Enoshima tram through Kamakura is well-known throughout Japan. Their green carriages have featured in many films and TV shows, and it is a quick and efficient way to get around. And at one stop, for you big kids out there, you can visit the Masamune craft shop and see how Samurai swords have been perfected for 24 generations. Fine dining: Eating well in HakoneWHERE TO EAT AND DRINK?In Hakone you can take in the fine dining tasting menu at the Hakone Kawakien Tenyu (which includes dressing in traditional Japanese garments). If you want to spend less, of course, the town is very tourist friendly, and there are plenty of bars and cafes to drop into.If you do go up the Owakudani valley, though, be sure to try the traditional kuro-tamago – an egg hard-boiled in a sulphurous volcanic pool until the shell turns black. Not only is it a great snack, it also is said to add seven years to your life.If you go to Kamakura, again there are plenty of bars, cafes and restaurants to swing by, but maybe you want something more fitting for the spiritual suroundings? At Yamonuchi you can combine a high-end dining experience with a Buddhist diet, with several courses of the best vegetarian fare. And for the bakers out there, try the famous dove-shaped hato sabure cookies at the historic Toshimaya bakery.A fine snack: Visiting a Japanese tea houseWHERE TO STAY?The previously mentioned Hakone Kowakien Ten-yu is a luxurious stop-off in the Hakone area, impressing with its own churning waterfalls and shrine on the hillside garden walk. There are plenty of other destinations that can offer the same onsen experience for less money. Japan 2019: See the splendour of Kanagawa between matches AT THE Japan 2019 Rugby World Cup, Yokohama will host some of the most exhilarating clashes in the competition – including the final. However, if you plan to visit Japan’s second city to take in the action, do yourself a favour and build in time to see some of what else the Kanagawa region has to offer.Be prepared, because a short trip from Yokohama lie two incredible, but completely different spots: Hakone and Kamakura. If you are heading to these places, make sure you bring your camera, and if you don’t find enlightenment, at the very least you’ll find relaxation.Natural splendour: A walk through the trees of HakoneWHERE IS IT?If you head south west, following the natural coastal curve of the Honshu island, you will get to Hakone, home of the region’s volcanic hot springs and spas. An hour and a half should see you get there, starting your journey from Shin-Yokohama station (near the International Stadium) or if you want a bit of history, you can take the Romancecar via the Odakyu line – this is a carriage famous for taking honeymooners to the famous resort town.Related: All you can see, do and eat in YokohamaFor something completely different, though, you can head to Kamakura, a spiritual haven. It is a hotbed of temples, shrines and religious sites and sights. Kamakura was an old Shogun capital, picked because of it’s religious significance. The town can be reached from Yokohama by taking a train form Hodogaya station.Relaxation: One of the hot thermal pools – onsen – in HakoneWHAT TO DO AND SEE?Hakone is all about the onsen – the natural hot baths. At a number of spa hotels, you can find these relaxing getaways where you can soak in relative tranquility.However, be prepared. You are expected to bathe nude. It is considered rude if you do not wash extensively before taking to the pools, if you wear any clothing and if you take a towel into the baths. There will be separate, closed off pools for men and women so you are not bathing together.Photo op: Our writer with a geisha in HakoneThere is plenty else to do in Hakone. If you plan ahead, you can hire the services of geishas for a gathering, thanks to Hakone Yumoto. But there’s a lot outdoors too. You can visit the Open Air Museum, with a plethora of sculptures and a Picasso Exhibition hall (with two stories of art from the legendary Spanish artist Pablo Picasso.) You can also visit nearby Gora Park, where you can take in the views or even visit the Crafthouse and take part in a bit of glassblowing.A must-see would be the Owakudani, an active volcano which you can see billowing out steam from its vents as you ascent via the Ropeway cable cars. Once you go down the other side you can also soak up spectacular views of Mt Fuji, before heading out for a cruise across the picturesque Lake Ashi.center_img This feature has been written in partnership with the JTB and the Kanagawa Prefectural Government If you are stopping off in Kamakura, the Kamakura Prince hotel has more of a familiar, old-school seaside holiday feel to it, and is on the road out of town. There are many other options along the beach front.For more information on where to stay, and much more, please visit trip.pref.kanagawa.jplast_img read more

Wales v Scotland live stream: How to watch the Six Nations from anywhere

first_img Ready for a showdown: Wales v Scotland starts Super Saturday (Getty) Wales v Scotland live stream: How to watch the Six Nations from anywhereThe 2020 Six Nations Championship Super Saturday extravaganza kicks off in Llanelli, as Wales welcome Scotland to Parc y Scarlets.A fascinating encounter lies ahead with plenty of narratives – from Alun Wyn Jones running out for his record-breaking men’s cap total, to Finn Russell’s return to Scotland’s ten jersey, and plenty more in between…Give our full Wales v Scotland preview a read and then use the below details to plan how to watch this brilliant curtain-raiser.How to watch Wales v Scotland from outside your countryIf you’re abroad, but still want to watch your local Six Nations coverage, like Wales v Scotland, you can do so by using a VPN – Virtual Private Network.VPNs allow you to get around any geo-blocking by changing your IP address so you appear in a different location and can watch the same legal Six Nations live stream you would at home.Our friends at TechRadar have tested hundreds of VPN and recommend ExpressVPN, which is easy to use, has strong security features and allows you to watch on several devices at once, including smart TVs and phones, iPads, tablets, PCs and Macs.Plus, ExpressVPN comes with a 30-day money-back guarantee. You can try it out for a month for free or sign up for an annual plan and get three months free.Check out ExpressVPN Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Wales v Scotland live stream: How to watch from the UKThe good news is that all Six Nations matches are available on free-to-air TV in the UK.Wales v Scotland, which kicks off at 2.15pm, will be shown live on BBC One in the UK.Welsh language channel S4C also has live coverage of Wales’ Six Nations match against Scotland.If you’re from the UK but are overseas when Wales v Scotland takes place, you can get your normal live stream but you’ll need a VPN – see the information above.Wales v Scotland live stream: How to watch from IrelandIn Ireland, Wales v Scotland is also on free-to-air TV, with Virgin Media One (formerly TV3) broadcasting live coverage of all Six Nations matches.You can also stream live TV through Virgin TV Anywhere if you’d rather watch on your phone, tablet or computer. Wales v Scotland live stream: How to watch from EuropeFrance 2, another free-to-air channel, has the rights to broadcast Wales v Scotland (kick-off 3.15pm) in France.In Italy, DMAX is showing Wales v Scotland (kick-off 3.15pm) and you can also live stream matches via its online player Dplay.If you’re in Austria, Germany or Switzerland, you can watch Wales v Scotland (kick-off 3.15-m) through the live and on-demand streaming service DAZN. Wales v Scotland live stream: How to watch from the USAIf you live in the States, the official broadcaster of Six Nations matches is NBC, with matches streamed on NBC Sports Gold so you can watch them anytime and anywhere.Wales v Scotland will kick off at 10.15pm EST and 7.15am on the West Coast.The NBC Sports Gold Pass for rugby is $79.99 and includes coverage of the Gallagher Premiership and European Champions and Challenge Cups as well as the Six Nations.Wales v Scotland live stream: How to watch from AustraliaFor those in Australia, Wales v Scotland (kick-off 1.15am on Sunday) is live on beIN Sports 3.Access to beIN Sports’ Connect package is $19.99 a month or $179.99 for a year and also includes lots of European football action. Plus, there is currently a two-week FREE trial offer, so you could take of advantage of that to watch these Six Nations matches!beIN Sports Connect packageYou can also stream beIN Sports’ coverage live and on-demand through Kayo Sports. A basic package is $25 a month and premium is $35 a month – and they are offering a FREE 14-day trial to new customers.Kayo Sports offercenter_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Here’s how to watch all the action from Llanelli Wales v Scotland live stream: How to watch from New ZealandIf you want to tune in to Wales v Scotland from the Land of the Long White Cloud, the match kicks off at 3.15am on Sunday on Sky Sport NZ One.It costs $31.99 a month to add Sky Sport to your Sky Starter pack ($25.99) but if you sign up for 12 months before 31 January 2021 you’ll get your first month free. Plus, you’ll get Sky Go, which allows you to watch live rugby wherever you are.Sky Sport NZ offer Wales v Scotland live stream: How to watch from South AfricaIf you want to watch the Six Nations from South Africa, SuperSport is the place to go.Wales v Scotland kicks off at 4.15pm on SuperSport Action.There are various DStv packages available that give access to SuperSport, ranging from Access, which has the Blitz and Variety 4 channels, to Premium, which includes all 18 sports channels.Wales v Scotland live stream: How to watch from AsiaRugbyPass live streams Six Nations matches in a lot of Asian countries, including China, India, Malaysia, Singapore and Thailand. To find out if the streaming service is available where you are and the cost, head to RugbyPass.We recommend VPN services in the context of legal recreational uses. For example:Accessing a service from another country (subject to the terms and conditions of that service)Protecting your online security and strengthening your online privacy when abroadWe do not support or condone the illegal or malicious use of VPN services. Consuming pirated content that is paid-for is neither endorsed nor approved by Future Publishing. last_img read more

La Convención procede a equilibrar la justicia ‘ambiental’ y ‘económica’

first_imgLa Convención procede a equilibrar la justicia ‘ambiental’ y ‘económica’ Por Lynette WilsonPosted Jul 26, 2012 General Convention, Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Collierville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Events Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 General Convention 2012 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Job Listing Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Knoxville, TN Tags The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Kivalina es la única aldea de la región del Noroeste de Alaska cerca al Ártico donde todavía cazan la ballena boreal, una tradición cultural y un sostén dietético que se ha visto severamente afectado por el adelgazamiento del hielo. En otro tiempo, los cazadores acampaban sobre el hielo durante semanas seguidas; en la actualidad, solo se quedan unos cuantos días y buscan sobre todo las ballenas que se han extraviado de la manada. Esta foto histórica muestra a un equipo de balleneros y se le debe a la cortesía de Janet Mitchell.[Episcopal News Service] En los últimos 20 años el estado de Iowa ha experimentado tres inundaciones críticas, la última, en 2008, dejó casi un tercio del estado bajo el agua.“Fue una inundación de [esas que ocurren cada] 500 años, que causó daños por $60.000 millones”, dijo la Muy Rda. Cathleen Bascom, deana de la iglesia catedral de San Pablo [St. Paul] en el centro de Des Moines, añadiendo que la frecuencia de las inundaciones “es lo que nos abrió los ojos al problema del cambio climático”.La catedral, que está situada en la calle High, junto con las otras cuatro restantes “iglesias viejas”, resistió las tormentas, pero las zonas bajas -habitadas en su mayoría por personas de bajos ingresos e inmigrantes- “fueron las que más sufrieron”, dijo ella.“Uno de los problemas de justicia económica de las que me hice consciente luego de la inundación fue que dejaron que el dique sobre Birland [un barrio que queda en terrenos bajos al norte de Des Moines] siguiera endeble, y en consecuencia se rompió”, dijo Bascom, añadiendo que las zonas río abajo, incluido el distrito financiero de la ciudad, han experimentado una re-aristocratización. “De manera que el agua no constituyo, por tanto, una amenaza para las propiedades más caras”.Bascom, diputada por Iowa a la 77ª. Convención General en Indianápolis del 3 al 13 de julio, testificó ante el Comité de Asuntos Nacionales e Internacionales [en la Convención] a favor de una resolución que aborde el tema de la justicia medioambiental (B023).En una entrevista telefónica con el Servicio de Prensa Episcopal posterior a la Convención, Bascom dijo que una de las cosas que a ella le gustó de la resolución fue que hace un llamado a la acción, que suplica a las instituciones, la Iglesia, las diócesis y congregaciones que “apoyen la implementación de soluciones al cambio climático a partir de las bases, de la comunidad”, entre ellas la restauración ecológica, promoviendo la soberanía alimentaria y haciendo adaptaciones locales a favor de la capacidad de recuperación. Esto último es algo que la catedral ya ha hecho al atenuar los residuos de agua de la tormenta.Al reemplazar el asfalto deteriorado con pavimento permeable y un sistema de filtración, la catedral tiene la capacidad de mantener una cantidad de agua equivalente a 12 piscinas al margen del sistema de alcantarillado desbordado por la tormenta y al margen del río, dijo Bascom. La catedral también plantó un jardín, incluidas algunas especies de plantas nativas como hierbas silvestres, que es irrigado por el agua. El jardín sirve también como una “estera de bienvenida” y le da un respiro a los trabajadores vecinos al tiempo que es un laboratorio de conservación para niños urbanos, añadió ella.Además de la B023, la Convención General aprobó la Resolución D055, que aboga por una política pública que reduzca las emisiones que provocan el cambio climático. Tanto la B023 como la D055, además de otras resoluciones anteriores de la Convención General, constituyen los fundamentos de la labor de justicia medioambiental y económica en el próximo trienio.“Para mí, dos de los problemas acerca de los cuales la Iglesia está llamada a mostrarse cada vez más visible y activa son el cambio climático y la pobreza y la inequidad económica”, dijo Michael Schut, funcionario encargado de asuntos ambientales y económicos de la Iglesia Episcopal. “La Resolución B023 nos llama a ‘resistir el desarrollo y la expansión de fuentes de combustible fósil cada vez menos convencionales, así como más peligrosas y destructoras del medio ambiente”.“Esa resistencia puede significar que debamos salir a las calles a protestar pacíficamente por esos empeños. Tal resistencia obviamente responde al llamado a ser más activo respecto al cambio climático. Pero la resolución reconoce que en tal resistencia la Iglesia debe apoyar a los que podrían perder sus empleos en la transición de una economía basada en combustibles fósiles a una economía de energía limpia… lo cual responde al llamado a abordar [el problema de] la pobreza”.Sin embargo, la necesidad de proteger el medio ambiente al tiempo de laborar simultáneamente por mitigar la pobreza, con frecuencia puede dejar a los episcopales en el frente sintiéndose en desacuerdo, especialmente en estados como Pensilvania, donde la tasa de desempleo es alta y donde la gente por generaciones ha vivido del trabajo en las minas y en los yacimientos de petróleo y de gas.“Encontrar la justa mezcla de justicia social que representa la buena mayordomía que hace la Iglesia del medio ambiente y su amor e interés por las personas y por aliviar la pobreza no es un camino fácil”, dijo Joan Gundersen, quien fue diputada por la Diócesis de Pittsburgh y miembro del Comité de Asuntos Nacionales e Internacionales de la Convención, en una entrevista con el Servicio de Prensa Episcopal el 17 de julio.En Pittsburgh, la diócesis tiene “un doble interés”, explicó Gundersen: “Por supuesto, estamos interesados en el medio ambiente, y cerciorándonos de que todo lo que se hace, se haga con prudencia, pero también estamos al corriente de las altas tasas de desempleo y de la necesidad de trabajo”.Pittsburgh se encuentra asentada sobre el esquisto de Marcellus, una enorme reserva de gas natural que subyace a más de kilómetro y medio debajo de la superficie y abarca una zona que se extiende dese Nueva York a través de partes de Pensilvania y penetra en Ohio y Virginia Occidental. Dada su localización cerca de importantes centros de población del este de Estados Unidos, algunos ven [el esquisto de] Marcellus como un yacimiento maduro para la explotación.En 2010, el municipio de Pittsburgh aprobó prohibirles a las corporaciones las perforaciones en busca de gas natural, incluida la fracturación hidráulica, dentro de los límites de la ciudad. La diócesis, que incluye zonas rurales con una alta tasa de desempleo como el norte de Cambria, no ha asumido una postura sobre la fracturación y no ha sostenido una “conversación a fondo” sobre el asunto, dijo Gundersen. Además, la Convención descartó una resolución en contra de “la fracturación riesgosa”.Durante una audiencia sobre la resolución D055, Gundersen testificó que lograr que aceptaran la resolución en Pittsburgh no resultaría difícil, pero no sería lo mismo en las zonas rurales circundantes.“Cuando uno está en el campo donde el 39 por ciento de la población se encuentra desempleada y estos combustibles representan su sustento”, dijo ella, “¿cómo uno la propone en las deprimidas zonas rurales de las minas de carbón?”.A diferencia de Virginia Occidental -donde el estado recibe una buena tajada de las ganancias generadas por la extracción de recursos, los cuales puede utilizar en la reparación de carreteras y en proyectos de restauración medioambiental- Pensilvania, donde la infraestructura y la regulación van un poco a la zaga, no recibe los mismos ingresos. Y dependiendo de donde uno se encuentra en Pensilvania, la reacción es desigual tocante a la contaminación ambiental, su alcance y su existencia, agregó.Una planta procesadora de gas natural, añadió Gundersen, se espera que abra a lo largo de la frontera entre Pensilvania y Ohio y lleve al menos 2.000 puestos de trabajo a la zona.La explicación de la Resolución D055 dice: “Otros costos de los combustibles fósiles incluyen derramamientos de petróleo, contaminación del agua subterránea con mercurio y otros contaminantes provenientes de las minas de carbón, y un inadecuado almacenamiento de desechos radioactivos como resultante de la hidrofracturación. Hay altos costos concomitantes de salud que provienen de la exposición a esos contaminantes…”Y prosigue [la resolución], “el uso continuo de combustibles fósiles no es sostenible”.También durante el testimonio, la Rda. Barbara Schlachter, visitante a la Convención proveniente de la Diócesis de Iowa y quien ayudó a fundar [la organización] Activistas del Clima en Iowa City, llamó la atención sobre lo que en verdad cuestan de los combustibles de bajo costo, como se señalaba en la explicación de la resolución, y pidió apoyo para las fuentes de energía renovables. Schlachter dijo que reducir la dependencia de los combustibles fósiles era una “cuestión moral”.“¿Qué va a ocurrirle a nuestro medio ambiente, a nuestra atmósfera -preguntó ella. Es [el cambio climático] que ya ha llegado a algunas partes y se acerca aquí”.Durante su testimonio sobre la B023 ante el comité, Austin Swan Sr., diputado de la Diócesis de Alaska y residente de Kivalina, una comunidad isla iñupiaq donde el cambio climático amenaza la continua existencia de la comunidad, compartió su experiencia.“He vivido durante toda mi vida en Kivalina, nací y me crié allí. Cuando yo era niño, teníamos probablemente dos tercios más de tierra, y ahora tenemos el 35 por ciento de esa tierra, toda esta pérdida se debe fundamentalmente a la erosión de los últimos cuatro o cinco años”, dijo él.Y a pesar de vivir en un ambiente rico en recursos naturales, entre ellos la mayor mina de zinc del mundo localizada río arriba, explicó Swan: “Seguimos viviendo en condiciones del tercer mundo. ¿Adónde se va ese dinero?”Propuesta por Mark Lattime, obispo de Alaska, la resolución expresa “Que la 77ª. Convención General de la Iglesia Episcopal se muestra solidaria con esas comunidades que sufren las mayores secuelas del cambio climático global: pueblos indígenas, comunidades de subsistencia, comunidades de color y personas que viven envilecidas en todo el mundo…”La aldea de Kivalina se encuentra en la punta de una isla barrera con una extensión de entre 9 y 12 kilómetros de largo -alrededor de medio kilómetro en su parte más ancha- y de 128 a 193 kilómetros por encima del Círculo Polar Ártico, entre el mar de Chukotka y la laguna Kivalina en Alaska. Es el hogar de alrededor de 400 personas y sólo se puede llegar al sitio por avión y barco en verano y por avión y motonieve en invierno.De las 200 comunidades costeras nativas de Alaska, diversos grados de erosión afectan a unas 180 de ellas, según la Oficina de Contaduría General del gobierno. El Cuerpo de Ingenieros del Ejército de EE.UU. ha dicho que Kivalina es una de las tres comunidades nativas que necesita relocalización.Tal como quedó dicho en la explicación de la resolución, Kivalina “ha estado en creciente riesgo permanente debido al cambio climático global. La pérdida de hielo marino ha dado lugar a un aumento de la erosión costera, falla del terreno y condiciones inestables si no peligrosas para la práctica de la caza de subsistencia”.En 2008, la aldea de Kivalina presentó una demanda legal contra 24 compañías petroleras, carboneras y de electricidad, entre ellas Exxon Mobile Corp., Conoco Phillips y BP. La demanda alega que, como destacados responsables de las emisiones de gas [que producen el efecto] invernadero, las corporaciones han exacerbado el calentamiento global y, en consecuencia, han acelerado la erosión en Kivalina dejando a la isla vulnerable a aumentos del nivel del mar e inundaciones debido a tormentas.Además, la explicación de la resolución dice que la Shell Oil se disponía a comenzar una exploración petrolera este mes en el mar de Chukotka, “la fuente más profunda de alimento, así como identidad cultural y espiritualidad de los iñupiaq”.Marc Andrus, el obispo de California, que respaldó la B023 y que integró el Comité de Asuntos Nacionales e Internacionales, dijo que el pueblo de Kivalina “se identifica con la isla y sus alrededores” y mudarse de allí no es tan sencillo como mudarse de Alabama para San Francisco, como hizo él cuando se convirtió en obispo.No difiere de lo que pasa con los guaraníes, una tribu indígena formalmente nómada en Brasil que ha perdido mucho de su tierra ancestral, para el pueblo de Kivalina mudarse “es una especie de muerte”, dijo él.(A través de una relación de compañerismo con la Diócesis de Curitiba en Brasil, la Diócesis de California ha apoyado los empeños de la Iglesia Anglicana de Brasil en defensa de los guaraníes).Mientras estaba en la Convención, escuchando las historias de los guaraníes y la situación en Kivalina, que se encuentran en situaciones “mucho más extremas”, Bascom se acordaba, dijo después, de una conferencia que dictó una vez el arzobispo de Cantórbery Rowan Williams titulada: “Renovar la faz de la Tierra: responsabilidad humana y medio ambiente”, en la cual él dijo:“Es posible debatir respecto al grado exacto en que la intervención humana es responsable de estos fenómenos… pero no es posible racionalmente negar lo que los habitantes de las tierras bajas en el mundo enfrentan habitualmente como la amenaza más inminente a sus vidas y medios de sustento”.— Lynette Wilson es redactora y reportera del Servicio de Prensa Episcopal. Traducido por Vicente Echerri. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Belleville, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Bath, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Press Release Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Press Release Service Environment & Climate Change, Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KYlast_img read more

‘Tithing with Trash’ cuts waste, turns hard-to-recycle rubbish into riches

first_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Bath, NC Press Release Service AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Environment & Climate Change October 12, 2012 at 4:04 pm Hello to all the green folks down in the Diocese of Atlanta! I can testify from personal experience about the amazing impact of Capt. Lane’s evangelism. (And it is truly that – part of the Good News: there is enough to go around, we are all inter-connected, the world in which we’re placed to live is a good gift from God, and on and on.) Keep it up, St. Gregory’s! You inspire the rest of us. And Holy Trinity – way to go on the No Styrofoam Zone! You all just keep on digger deeper into faithfulness around these issues. Up here at St. Luke’s, New Haven, we are about to start our stewardship season. I would love to add “Tithing With Trash” into the mix of our conversations! (I hadn’t thought I’d be here into the fall, so if I’m staying longer, they will be hearing more of Mother Debbie’s passion around caring for creation! Stay tuned!) (And will post this to the parish Facebook page so they know I’m saying this!Peace from this (at least temporary) Connecticut Yankee,Debbie Shew+P.S. And thanks to Alexis and episcopaldigitalnetwork for getting this out into cyberspace where many more people can be inspired and take action. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 October 22, 2012 at 11:52 am Debbie – it is so good to hear from you. If you ever need any help with any eco-stewardship resources, please don’t hesitate to let me know. Even though you don’t live in Atlanta anymore that doesn’t mean I can’t still be helpful.Alexis ChaseGeorgia Interfaith Power & Light, gipl.org Comments are closed. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Tags Director of Music Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Job Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Featured Events Rector Smithfield, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Alexis Chase says: Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate Diocese of Nebraska New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Andrew Lane aka Captain PLaneT says: Rector Knoxville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA Kathy Stege of St. Gregory the Great Episcopal Church contributes to Tithing with Trash by placing a Solo Cup inside a TerraCycle collection bin at the Athens, Ga., church. Photo/Andrew Lane[Episcopal News Service] Georgia Army National Guard Capt. Andrew Lane is a man on a mission. If it’s recyclable, “Captain PLaneT” aims to keep it out of the local landfill – and earn cash for his parish while he’s at it.Lane launched a Tithing with Trash program at St. Gregory the Great Episcopal Church in Athens, Georgia, when he returned home from a deployment in Afghanistan in 2010. Since then, the congregation has earned nearly $4,800 collecting hard-to-recycle items such as empty toothpaste tubes and Solo Cups and sending them to TerraCycle in Trenton, New Jersey, to earn 2 cents per item. TerraCycle, in turn, recycles or “upcycles” the trash – turning it into “green” products such as backpacks fashioned from Lay’s potato chip bags.“They’re not just doing it to hug trees or sing ‘Kumbaya.’ They’re turning it into artwork or consumer products,” Lane said.The nonprofit TerraCycle partners with some of the world’s largest companies, who sponsor collection programs for particular waste streams – say, spent writing utensils or empty tape dispensers, explained Lauren Taylor, U.S. public relations director. Some sponsor only collection of their brands’ trash, while others accept any related items. Kraft’s “dairy tub brigade,” for example, takes all manner of dairy-product tubs, lids, foil tops and other packaging.Individuals such as Lane sign up to join a sponsored trash “brigade,” collecting and shipping specified items via United Parcel Service for free to TerraCycle and receiving “points” they turn into cash. “The money earned needs to go to a charity,” Taylor said. “Somebody can’t just decide this could be a great side job for them.”TerraCycle “upcycles” some trash into useable products such as this backpack created from Lay’s potato chip bags. Photo/TerraCycletoday“The majority of the people who collect for us are schools,” she said. They set up lunchroom collection points – juice-drink pouches here, candy wrappers there – often after a parent or teacher realizes how much trash is being pitched and thinks, “We’re throwing money away.”It’s hard to quantify, but churches also participate, and St. Gregory is one of a handful of Episcopal churches signed up to benefit from TerraCycle trash, Taylor said. “We definitely know Andrew because he is just so energetic and just loves our programs and really motivates people to collect. … He is definitely among the most highly motivated.”Lane is a sustainability evangelist.“It’s really powerful, because we’re the only creatures in existence that we know of that generate trash that we have to pay someone to haul off,” he said. Without addressing sustainability issues, he said, “for our grandkids it could be deep, deep, deep trouble.”“We might actually trash this planet and poison its water or run out of water … without an epidemic or a war.”Lane has given diocesan council presentations about TerraCycle and met Diocese of Atlanta Bishop-elect Robert Wright while separating food waste at the Mikell Camp and Conference Center. “He actually came and shook my hand. He said, ‘I see you’re not actually just speaking; you’re a man of action.’”In Athens, Lane is lobbying a Kroger grocery store to let the church maintain a collection container for TerraCycle trash. At St. Gregory, parishioners place items in assorted labeled bins.“I see people carrying in their containers and standing out there and sorting stuff out in Andrew’s elaborate bins,” said parishioner Lois Alworth, a member of the church’s Green Guild/Creation Keepers committee that Lane chairs. “There’s not a whole lot that the church itself uses that TerraCycle takes. What we get is what people bring from home.”“We all laugh and say because we’re Episcopalians everybody has lots of wine corks,” she said. “TerraCycle takes really odd things, [like] toothpaste containers, when they’re empty, and old toothbrushes.”Every four to six weeks, committee members gather after church for a “box-up event” to package the TerraCycle items for shipping, she said.Empty drink pouches were used to make this lunch box. Photo/TerraCycleEven here, recycling comes into play. Lane sometimes uses economy-size cat-food, dog-food or chicken-feed bags as shipping envelopes for TerraCycle trash. UPS doesn’t mind as long as the packages aren’t leaking liquid, he said. “You could mail a sweater in there if you didn’t care if your sweater smelled like dog food.”TerraCycle collects waste in 20 countries, with almost 32 million trash collectors and nearly 2.5 billion units of waste collected in the United States since 2007, Taylor said.Lane has his eye on a program started in Canada and expected to launch in the United States this month: a “cigarette butt brigade” that will take all cigarette waste, including the plastic wrap and aluminum board from packaging. This tackles “one of the dirtiest, one of the most prolific forms of waste,” said Lane, who is in his second semester studying for an Army graduate certificate of sustainability through Arizona State University. Look at any paved road in America, and you’ll see cigarette butts, he said. “They’re thrown out, and they sit there until eternity, until they’re washed into a stream or a river.”A discussion with Lane ranges to environmental topics far beyond TerraCycle, from his battle to promote recycling at the Army’s Fort Stewart to the near-extinction of white rhinos to the role of black soldier flies in composting to Germany’s renewable-energy goals. He describes listening to his son read how Native Americans taught the Pilgrims to bury dead fish with corn plants as fertilizer and noting, “That’s composting.”At St. Gregory, green initiatives likewise move beyond TerraCycle. The congregation assiduously composts food and paper waste. A church webpage provides current and cumulative data for energy generated by the parish’s months-old solar panels (2.99 megawatt hours so far, enough to power 99 houses for a day and offset 2.07 tons of carbon or the equivalent of 53 trees). Next up: a 450-gallon rain cistern.“We just need to hook the gutters to it, and we’ll be in business,” Lane said, noting that an inch of rain on a 1,000-square-foot roofline translates to 500 to 600 gallons of water. Installing the gravity-fed cistern to water plans is “taking what the good Lord has given us and not squandering it.”“Our church,” he said, “may be the greenest church in Georgia.”Georgia Interfaith Power and Light has supported St. Gregory in its green efforts and awarded the church a Trailblazer Award for its TerraCycle program.“We encourage all of our congregations to get involved in more intelligent ways of thinking about their waste and … where they throw things,” Executive Director Alexis Chase said. “Other churches are considering doing TerraCycle. Everyone is sort of trying to figure out a way they can be involved.”Some “brigades” are full, based on the funds partner companies provide, but Lane offers a solution for churches that still want to participate. By request, he’ll send shipping labels for them to send trash to Trenton. He keeps track of the resulting cash and sends 80 percent to the participating church, with 20 percent going to St. Gregory.“It has two positives: You get paid for it, and you know you’re doing a good thing for the planet,” Alworth said.But eliminating waste does create a headache or two at church. It took awhile to convince Lane – who says he believes in “zero waste” – that they still needed a trash container despite the TerraCycle, recycling and compost bins, Alworth said.Once, a mass of fruit flies flew out of an unemptied compost bin while they were setting up a funeral repast; they spent the whole time trying to “swoosh flies away” inconspicuously, she recalled. “That was the one time we came close to not composting anymore.”“It’s not something you take real lightly, and not every parish has an Andrew,” she said.But overall, she sees participating in composting and TerraCycle as good stewardship of God’s creation.“Anything that we do like this helps us to feel like we’re being better stewards than we would be if we sent all this stuff to the landfill to just sit there and pile up,” she said. “I think that’s why people do it. They love the church, they love each other, and they’re willing to do this for the betterment of everything.”Sharon Sheridan is an ENS correspondent. Rector Tampa, FL Featured Jobs & Calls Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Advocacy Peace & Justice, Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit an Event Listing October 11, 2012 at 11:59 pm Greetings R. Biidwell,Amen. I am working on a No Styrofoam Zone following in the footsteps of our Sister Church, Holy Trinity, in Decatur, Georgia. Styrofoam use for a 20 minute beverage or meal should be made illegal. Its high R-Value should be reserved for buildings and structures that will be around for half a century at the minimum! write me if I can help you get going on Tithing with Trash. [email protected] Submit a Press Release Rector Belleville, IL ‘Tithing with Trash’ cuts waste, turns hard-to-recycle rubbish into riches Debbie Shew says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA By Sharon SheridanPosted Oct 10, 2012 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Comments (3) last_img read more

La diócesis de Jerusalén brinda servicios de salud y educación…

first_img Rector Bath, NC Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH [Episcopal News Service] Por cada niño física o evolutivamente discapacitado que atienden en el Centro Princesa Basma para Niños Discapacitados de Jerusalén Oriental, otros 20 son atendidos en centros locales o intermedios a lo largo y ancho de la Cisjordania.“Somos el único centro de calidad que ofrece completa rehabilitación en Palestina; competimos con otros en el mundo árabe y ninguno obtiene nuestros resultados”, dijo Maha Yasmineh, directora ejecutiva en funciones de Princesa Basma. “Hemos alcanzado un nivel que tenemos que mantener, nadie más puede hacerlo”.En 2005, el Centro Princesa Basma fue reconocido por el innovador servicio de alta calidad que le presta a los niños y sus familias. El centro se inauguró en 1965 y en 1987 fue la primera escuela en integrar niños discapacitados en las clases ordinarias.“Ha sido un éxito tal que nos estamos convirtiendo en mentores de otras escuelas”, dijo Yasmineh, añadiendo que muchos de los discapacitados que se gradúan en la escuela han continuado estudiando en la universidad.La escuela no tenía clases y los pasillos estaban silenciosos, salvo por unas cuantas madres y sus hijos, cuando la obispa primada Katharine Jefferts Schori visitó el Princesa Basma a fines de diciembre durante su viaje de 12 días a Israel y los Territorios Palestinos en Navidad y Año Nuevo.La obispa primada visitó la diócesis atendiendo la invitación de Suheil Dawani, obispo anglicano de Jerusalén.“La Diócesis de Jerusalén tiene una larga e importante relación con la Iglesia Episcopal americana, vuestro apoyo a la diócesis ha sido firme y generoso”, dijo Dawani a Jefferts Schori durante la visita.En el curso de su visita a Princesa Basma —que debe su nombre a la princesa de Jordania que inauguró el centro en los años sesenta—, la obispa primada se enteró del Programa de Capacitación Materna y de algunos retos a los que el centro se enfrenta.Cada año, de 250 a 300 madres y sus hijos pasan entre dos y cuatro semanas viviendo en el centro. Los niños reciben un tratamiento de rehabilitación completo y las madres aprenden atender a sus hijos, muchos de los cuales padecen de anomalías congénitas.“Muchísimas madres no saben nada sobre la discapacidad”, dijo el Dr. Waddah Malhees, director médico del programa de rehabilitación. “Las enseñamos a cuidar a sus hijos, y a continuar con la rehabilitación”.(En 2012, añadió Malhees, el centro Princesa Basma llegó a ser el primero en tratar a niños palestinos autistas, y es el único centro que trata a niños autistas y capacita a sus familias).Más recientemente, sin embargo, debido a reducciones presupuestarias, las madres y los hijos deben abandonar el centro los jueves por la noche y regresar los sábados, lo cual significa que deben pagar los costos de transporte y pasar por los puntos de control entre Jerusalén y sus hogares en Cisjordania explicó el personal.Ochenta y siete por ciento del presupuesto del centro es generado por costos de servicio y matrícula escolar. El 13 por ciento de déficit del presupuesto que se prevé para 2013 representa alrededor de $268.000, dijo Yasmineh.“El trece por ciento es muchísimo dinero”, afirmó. “Estamos atendiendo niños necesitados en los Territorios Palestinos, y si nosotros no lo hacemos, nadie lo hará”.La Diócesis Episcopal de Jerusalén dirige 35 instituciones sanitarias y docentes a través de cinco países y la Cisjordania controlada por la Autoridad Palestina y también en Gaza, donde se encuentra el hospital Ahli Arab, que es una de sólo tres instituciones dirigidas por cristianos.Haga un clic aquí para ver una historia específica sobre el hospital de Gaza“Estas instituciones llevan a cabo un ministerio maravilloso y asombroso en un lugar con un historial multirreligioso y multiétnico y, en consecuencia, es vital para la Iglesia seguir ofreciendo estos servicios, porque estas instituciones, así como las iglesias, desempeñan un papel moderador y muy importante en la sociedad”, dijo el Muy Rdo. Hosam Naoum, deán de la catedral de San Jorge [St. George’s Cathedral] en Jerusalén, en una entrevista el 1 de enero en el patio de la hostería de San Jorge.“Existimos para edificar una comunidad de tolerancia, de reconciliación y una comunidad que tiene una comprensión mutua de la fe, la cultura y la tradición del otro”. Y añadió: “Estas instituciones, así como el ministerio parroquial, ofrecen un terreno sano y fértil para futuros y potenciales líderes de la comunidad. Y [para] personas que están bien preparadas y que sostienen relaciones positivas. Y esto es lo que soñamos, establecer realmente una comunidad que le permita tanto a judíos como a palestinos convivir para crear una sociedad donde todo el mundo importe”.Las escuelas son la mayoría de las instituciones diocesanas, y la escuela de San Juan en Haifa ha educado a generaciones de niños musulmanes, judíos y cristianos. Cada mañana, los 575 estudiantes, 50 por ciento de ellos musulmanes, se reúnen en una asamblea matutina y a la escuela no sólo se le reconoce por su alta calidad docente (ya en el kindergarten se introducen nociones de investigación científica), sino también por su formación a favor de la “paz”.“Estamos haciendo un magnífico trabajo, pero no evangelizamos”, dijo Wajeeh Awad, que ha estado 52 años en la escuela, durante un almuerzo en Haifa a fines de diciembre. Awad es ex director y ahora es miembro de la junta directiva de la escuela.Además del Princesa Basma, el hospital de Gaza y la escuela de Haifa, la obispa primada visitó también el hospital de San Lucas en Nablus; una clínica de diabetes que está a punto de inaugurarse en los terrenos de la iglesia de San Andrés en Ramala; así como el sitio donde se construye un hogar de ancianos y centro comunitario de 40 camas en los terrenos de la iglesia de San Pedro en Birzeit, un suburbio de Ramala.Reflexionando sobre las visitas, la obispa primada dijo: “es obvio que los cristianos son los principales constructores de puentes, y ven su ministerio como el servicio a todo el pueblo de Dios, a todos los hijos de Abraham.“La obra que la diócesis de Jerusalén lleva a cabo es de profunda importancia”.En los territorios palestinos, del 10 al 15 por ciento de la población padece de diabetes, de la cual el alto nivel de estrés se cree que sea un factor, en contraste con el tres por ciento de la tasa global, dijo el Dr. Hisham Nassar, que es el asesor de atención sanitaria de la diócesis. Nassar abordó el tema durante un almuerzo en la iglesia de San Andrés en Ramala en diciembre pasado.La clínica diabética localizada en la iglesia abrirá seis días a la semana y se espera que atienda de 300 a 400 personas al mes. La clínica también ofrecerá sesiones de información mensualmente, explicó Dawani durante un recorrido por la modernísima clínica en diciembre pasado.En el hospital de San Lucas, en Nablus, nueve comadronas partean un promedio de 180 bebés al mes. Si una madre tiene un parto normal, su estada en el hospital es de seis horas. El hospital cuenta también con una unidad neonatal de terapia intensiva para los casos complicados.Con 150 empleados, el hospital médico y quirúrgico de 60 camas atiende anualmente a más de 70.000 pacientes de Nablus y las aldeas circunvecinas “independientemente de su raza o de su condición social”.Sin embargo, un tomógrafo computarizado, roto desde 2010, permanece inactivo en la planta baja del hospital, lo cual constituye un problema para esta institución que tiene el único departamento de urgencias traumáticas del norte de Cisjordania, un área de 500.000 habitantes, por lo cual también funciona como un centro de referencia para todos los casos de neurocirugía.“Aquí tenemos un personal que brinda atención médica a bajo costo, sirviendo a todo el que entra por la puerta. ¿Cómo se las arreglan para [tratar casos de] neurología y cardiología [sin el funcionamiento de un tomógrafo]? El ver esta máquina que no funciona realmente me inspiró [a ayudar]”, dijo el obispo James Magness, obispo sufragáneo de la Iglesia Episcopal para los ministerios federales, luego de una visita al hospital.“Su nivel de compromiso [del personal del hospital] es inspirador y en verdad me motiva a querer ayudar. Ver las escuelas y hospitales y la manera en que trabajan atrae a las personas”.Los diversos ministerios diocesanos enfrentan muchos desafíos, algunos como resultado de la crisis económica mundial, algunos como consecuencia de la política en Israel y los Territorios Palestinos. Pero la reducción presupuestaria en el Princesa Basma, que también dio lugar a que 12 empleados perdieran sus empleos, y que puede obligar al cierre del taller ortopédico del centro; el tomógrafo roto del San Lucas y la transición del hospital de Gaza luego de perder el apoyo económico de la Agencia de las Naciones Unidas para los Refugiados de Palestina, no han afectado la capacidad de la institución [diocesana] de brindar atención de calidad a los pacientes.“El lugar donde uno ve esperanza es en el campo de la medicina”, dijo el Rdo. Canónigo Robert Edmund, encargado de asociaciones globales de la Iglesia Episcopal con el Oriente Medio, en una entrevista con ENS en Jerusalén. “Tratan a todo el que entre por la puerta. Y el nivel de atención que se brinda es el nivel que pueden ofrecer. Hacen todo lo más que pueden con lo que disponen”.– Lynette Wilson es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service.Traducción de Vicente Echerri Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Events Submit a Press Release Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET La diócesis de Jerusalén brinda servicios de salud y educación a los palestinos Retos a que se enfrenta el ministerio The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group center_img Rector Albany, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Por Lynette WilsonPosted Jan 18, 2013 Rector Tampa, FL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Smithfield, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Collierville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Belleville, IL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 last_img read more

Training equips volunteers to launch, sustain outreach ministries

first_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ By Sharon SheridanPosted Feb 18, 2014 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Canon Richard Miller says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Comments are closed. Press Release Service TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Albany, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Comments (2) Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Collierville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA February 18, 2014 at 4:23 pm Wonderful ministries are being supported by Episcopal Charties and shared with the community. This is what Jesus asks of us all. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME February 18, 2014 at 4:29 pm Wow, this sounds wonderful!! I am a Episcopal Service Corps scholar and they give grants for congregational transformation. I’m wondering if anyone from your group would apply for the funding to help train more trainers around the country and help other dioceses implement this program! Funding may also help provide the curriculum in English and Spanish if it isn’t already done. I would love to bring this type of outreach ministry training into my congregation and am sure that the Diocese of VA would benefit from it! Blessings! Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA center_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Bath, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Rev. Daniel Velez Rivera says: Kokie Dinnan, standing at far right, is among the instructors for Beyond the Walls: Outreach Ministry, Administration and Fundraising, offered in the Diocese of Southeast Florida. Dinnan is executive director of Family Promise of South Palm Beach County. Photo/Family Promise of South Palm Beach County[Episcopal News Service] Luz Espona Perez-Iturbe’s relatives in her native Argentina were surprised to hear that some Americans go hungry. But the need, she tells them, is real, fed by the economic downturn, unemployment and government budget cuts.Perez-Iturbe is seeking to meet that need in a collaborative effort between two Miami-area Episcopal churches: St. Faith’s in Cutler Bay, which operates a food pantry, and her parish of St. Luke the Physician, Kendall, which will support food-collection efforts. She’s taking a leadership role in the initiative, learning how to assess the community’s needs, marshal resources and volunteers and understand it all within a scriptural context thanks to a diocesan training program for laity and clergy involved in congregational outreach.“Beyond the Walls: Outreach Ministry Development, Administration and Fundraising” is a yearlong certificate program that Episcopal Charities of Southeast Florida offers in partnership with the Diocesan School for Christian Studies. Open to all in the diocese, and required for diaconal students, the program provides classes led by visiting professionals who teach the basics of beginning, operating, funding and sustaining a congregational outreach ministry.The program’s genesis was in workshops offered through Episcopal Charities of New York when the Rev. Donna Lise Dambrot was associate director.  She brought the concept to Southeast Florida when she became president and executive director of Episcopal Charities there in 2009.“There’s a certain DNA of congregational outreach ministry that’s very different” from a typical social-service agency, she said. “It’s very often volunteer-based, and people feel called to serve perhaps as a result of our Gospel call of Matthew 25. But they don’t have the skills or the tools to really create and manage and operate and sustain the program.”So, for example, a group of enthusiastic volunteers may begin a food pantry or after-school program that the community begins to depend on, she said. But as the core of volunteers decreases over time, and no sustainability measures are put in place, the program gradually dwindles and closes.In Southeast Florida, Episcopal Charities began offering workshops to address issues such as how to use volunteers, how to construct a budget, how to market an outreach program. With a Roanridge Trust grant, the agency made Online Outreach University video workshops available.But they decided “this isn’t enough,” Dambrot said. “There has been no program … that really offers the soup-to-nuts type of toolbox of ‘how do you do outreach ministry’ that’s geared to congregations and the real specific and particular needs of congregational life.”So Episcopal Charities created a curriculum and partnered with the diocesan school. Classes are offered at St. Mark’s Episcopal School in Fort Lauderdale. Students also can take an individual class – say, just to learn about developing a program budget. The diocesan program currently has eight students – the highest of any class in the school — with the number attending almost doubling for some individual sessions, Dambrot said. Her mantra is: “Just keep flexible and keep responsive to the needs we hear from our community.”The course begins with sessions exploring what called the students to outreach ministry and the discernment process for choosing an outreach program. Subsequent classes tackle topics from how to create a program budget and developing and sustaining a committed core of volunteers to marketing, funding sources, grant writing, preparing for leadership succession and assessing the ongoing need for a program’s services.Dambrot teaches some classes, but outside presenters from various agencies, including the Episcopal Church Office of Communication, teach most of them.  “We have assembled a panel of teachers that are professionally doing the work that they’re teaching,” she said.Kokie Dinnan, executive director of Family Promise of South Palm Beach County, has led classes on how to recruit, train, use and retain volunteers. An interfaith ministry, Family Promise houses homeless families in congregations on a rotating basis and helps clients access needed social services. Previously, she did children’s and family ministry in Episcopal congregations and saw firsthand the need for supporting and educating those involved in outreach, she said. “Any opportunity that can be given to support those that are doing work in our community is vital and valid and important.”At Family Promise, “I train volunteers all the time, but this was like training the trainer,” she said. Her most recent Beyond the Walls class had students of varied backgrounds, including some diaconal students. “They were hungry for how to be able to take what they’re learning and take it back and implement it in their lives.”Her instructions on engaging volunteers begin with the importance of the “personal ask.”“People don’t necessarily respond to an advertisement,” she said. It’s also important to recognize people’s skills and what they do and don’t enjoy doing. “Help them to be able to use the gifts that they want to use. Put them where they’re going to feel comfortable.”Once people are involved, she said, “I don’t think you can ever tell a volunteer too many times how much you appreciate them and thank them for what they’re doing.”It’s also important to empower volunteers and make sure they feel like you’re working together to accomplish something, she said. When someone works with her, “I don’t want people to feel like I am the boss and you have to do this because Kokie said so. I want people to be empowered and to come and say, ‘Look, this needs to be done. How can we accomplish this?’”“Everyone needs to have a stake in what you’re doing,” she said. “If you can provide that, your volunteers are going to stay. … To me, it’s all about relationship building.”Perez-Iturbe, who previously volunteered at Zoo Miami and in youth ministries, said taking the diocesan course has taught her to take volunteering seriously, as well as how to organize herself and tools for assessing a community’s needs and how to meet them.“Going to do ministry … sometimes you don’t really know what to do and how to do it,” she said. “I’ve been volunteering for many years. I kind of know how to do things as of now, but this is like the ABCs, and Scripture-based. Everything that I do now, I truly understand the Baptismal Covenant behind it.”“There’s not a lot of money; there’s a lot of need,” she added. “This course helps you develop, see what the need is, allocate resources accordingly and wisely.”She also appreciates that the instructors provide contact information for following up if you need assistance with a particular issue, she said. “You can call them back and say, ‘Hey, can you help me with this?’ and they’re so welcoming.”St. Luke’s first food collection for the pantry at St. Faith’s will happen Feb. 23. This sort of collaborative ministry Perez-Iturbe is fostering is precisely the sort of ministry Episcopal Charities likes to support.“Our goal is to create a collaborative diocesan outreach that transcends the walls of a particular congregation because we think that’s the best way or the most loving way we can serve people, realizing that each community has its own specific needs and challenges,” Dambrot said.“Sometimes our congregations tend to be a little insular. They want to work together, but sometimes there’s maybe not even a thought of, ‘Hey, let’s collaborate with the church down the street or the nearest Episcopal church … and maybe we can do something big and in the process create community and in the process maybe enlarge our hearts in the gospel.”“I see Episcopal Charities as really a part of that process of gathering people, taking them outside their doors and bringing them together, creating a community of those who feel called to serve.”To serve potential students located a long drive from campus, they plan to offer online classes in the fall using Webex, an online video conferencing service, and an audio-visual screen system the diocese has in different locations, Dambrot said.She hopes they can offer the Beyond the Walls training to the wider church as well, she said. “We definitely plan on taking the materials and having the material available because they’re great materials. … We want to make this available beyond the walls of the diocese.”— Sharon Sheridan is an ENS correspondent. Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Job Listing Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Belleville, IL Featured Jobs & Calls Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit an Event Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Training equips volunteers to launch, sustain outreach ministries Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Press Release Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs last_img read more

EDS names Thomas Eoyang Jr. as dean of students and…

first_img Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Bath, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Events TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Rector Smithfield, NC People, Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Jobs & Calls Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Tags Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Theological Education Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Youth Minister Lorton, VA center_img Rector Pittsburgh, PA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET [Episcopal Divinity School press release] Episcopal Divinity School has announced the appointment of the Rev. Thomas Eoyang Jr. (MDiv ’03, DMin ’14) as the school’s dean of students and community life. Eoyang will begin his appointment on June 1, and will reside on the EDS campus in Cambridge, Massachusetts.“We are thrilled to welcome Thomas Eoyang back to EDS as dean of students and community life,” said the Very Rev. Francis Fornaro, interim president and dean. “As both an EDS alumnus and a pastoral leader, Thomas brings incredible insight and experience to the position. The dean of students and community life is so important in each student’s formation in lay or ordained ministry, and because Thomas has been there, both as an EDS student, as a scholar, and in parish ministry, I know he will be an invaluable asset to this community.”Eoyang earned both his MDiv and DMin degrees from Episcopal Divinity School. For the last seven years, he has served as rector of Grace Epiphany Church in Philadelphia. Previously he served as interim rector at Trinity Memorial Church in Philadelphia and as assistant to the rector at St. Peter’s Church in Glenside, Pennsylvania. He was ordained a priest in the Diocese of Pennsylvania in 2004.“I am very excited to return to the school that was so instrumental in my own formation,” said Eoyang. “As dean of students and community life I look forward to working closely with students, faculty, staff, and EDS alumni/ae and friends and help to strengthen and grow this vibrant theological community.”Prior to his ordination, Eoyang worked in medical and health sciences publishing, most recently as editor-in-chief of nursing books in Philadelphia.In addition to his EDS degrees, Eoyang holds an MA in comparative literature from Stanford University, and graduated cum laude from Harvard College, where he studied English history and literature.The press release from Episcopal Divinity School is available here. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Albany, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Belleville, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem EDS names Thomas Eoyang Jr. as dean of students and community life Posted May 20, 2015 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Collierville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA Submit an Event Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Job Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Tampa, FL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest last_img read more