Art center exhibitor named to International society

first_img Print Article Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration By The Penny Hoarder By Jaine Treadwell Garst entered into membership in the ISAP with Signature Member Status along with his wife, Deb. There are only two other Alabama artists who have received signature status in ISAP, and the Garsts are the first from the River Regions area. They are also the first married couple to have paintings accepted at the same time and the first husband/wife in the history of the society to become signature members.“We received Signature Member Status for life, which entitles us to participate in the ISAP Signature Members Show without having to be juried in,” Garst said. “We can now sign our work with ISAP after our names and use it to promote our work.”With this membership, the Garsts are now competing with other artists from around the world. Latest Stories Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Email the author Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Acid Reflux (Watch Now)Healthy LifestyleIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthTop 4 Methods to Get Fortnite SkinsTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancelcenter_img “Our first big break came last January when we each had a painting juried into the Alabama Wildlife Federation’s Flora and Fauna Show,” Garst said. “There were only 54 artists represented from across the state. In February, two of my watercolors were accepted into the Tallahassee Watercolor Societies Tri-State Show. Only 75 pieces were selected out of Florida, Alabama, and Georgia, and the competition was fierce.”In a short time, the Garsts received a letter from the Dauphin Island Chamber of Commerce informing them they had been juried into the third annual Dauphin Island Art Festival.“Deb and I began creating paintings for this festival last November but didn’t find out we had gotten in until mid-April,” Garst said. “Only three prizes were awarded for the entire festival, and Deb got second place. When we returned home from the Dauphin Island show, we received notification that one of my watercolors had been juried into the Watercolor Society of Alabama National Show at the Johnson Center for the Arts in Troy. This show includes artists from all across the United States and the work is incredible. Sponsored Content Art center exhibitor named to International society Book Nook to reopen The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… About a month ago, Steve and Deb Garst sent some of their paintings to California with hopes of being accepted into the International Society of Acrylic Painters (ISAP) Thirteenth Annual International Show.“We knew we were taking a giant leap but figured we had nothing to lose,” Garst said. “When last Monday’s mail arrived we held the letters and just looked at each other. I think we were prepared for the ‘rejection letter’ but not for what we got. Deb ripped open her envelope and the first word said it all…“Congratulations!” At this point I wasn’t sure I wanted to open mine, but I was also pleasantly surprised with the same lead in.“As we prepare to head to Santa Cruz, California, we are very proud to be representing the great State of Alabama.”Last September Garst retired as the senior illustrator and art director for Air University Press at Maxwell AFB, so he and his wife could focus on their love for fine art and photography. They built their Dog House Studio at their home in Wetumpka and can walk out their back door and create their paintings every day. Published 7:34 pm Friday, July 9, 2010 You Might Like Pioneer Farmers Market ‘going to the dogs’ The Pioneer Farmers Market has joined the Troy Animal Shelter Coalition in an effort to raise awareness of the plight… read more An Alabama artist whose work is on exhibit in the Watercolor Society of Alabama’s National Show at the Johnson Center for the Arts has been accepted into the International Society of Acrylic Painters.Steven Garst of Wetumpka has been admitted into membership of the prestigious society. His watercolor painting, titled “MJ and Billy” will remain on exhibit along with 100 other watercolors at the Johnson Center through July 17.“The International Society of Acrylic Painters is a very prestigious society,” said Richard Metzger, executive director of the Johnson Center for the Arts. “We are proud to have Steven Garst’s work on display. Our goal has been to exhibit the highest quality artwork. Being a young arts center and having one of the exhibiting artists included in the prestigious ISAP membership is evidence that we are continuing to pursue our mission to work toward cultural enrichment in the lives of the people of our community.”last_img read more

U.S. utility-scale solar purchases rising sharply—SEIA

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Reuters:Procurement of solar energy by U.S. utilities “exploded” in the first half of 2018, prompting a prominent research group to boost its five-year installation forecast on Thursday despite the Trump administration’s steep tariffs on imported panels.A record 8.5 gigawatts (GW) of utility solar projects were procured in the first six months of this year after President Donald Trump in January announced a 30 percent tariff on panels produced overseas, according to the report by Wood Mackenzie Power & Renewables and industry trade group the Solar Energy Industries Association.As a result, the research firm raised its utility-scale solar forecast for 2018 through 2023 by 1.9 GW. The forecast is still 8 percent lower than before the tariffs were announced. A gigawatt of solar energy can power about 164,000 homes.In every segment of the market except residential, system pricing is at its lowest level ever, the report said. Utility projects make up more than half the solar market.Utilities are eager to get projects going because of a federal solar tax credit that will begin phasing out in 2020. Next year will be the most impacted by the tariffs, Wood Mackenzie said. Developers will begin projects next year to claim the highest level of tax credit but delay buying modules until 2020 because the tariff drops by 5 percent each year.In the first half of the year, the U.S. installed 4.7 GW of solar, accounting for nearly a third of new electricity generating capacity additions. In the second quarter, residential installations were roughly flat with last year at 577 MW, while commercial and industrial installations slid 8 percent to 453 MW.More: U.S. utility solar contracts ‘exploded’ in 2018 despite tariffs: report U.S. utility-scale solar purchases rising sharply—SEIAlast_img read more